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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bothwell in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, United Kingdom
 

‘The Most Magnificent Ruin in Scotland’

Bothwell Castle

 
 
'The Most Magnificent Ruin in Scotland' Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
1. 'The Most Magnificent Ruin in Scotland' Marker
Inscription.
Torn apart by the Wars of Independence, this stalwart castle survived siege after siege. Rebuilt, it became an imposing noble and royal stronghold.

Castle Highlights
1. Donjon, William Murray's grand residence.
2. Prison tower with a miserable pit-prison in the basement.
3. South-east tower, crowned with an elaborate corbelled parapet.
4. Great hall, the main banqueting room.

Status Symbol
Bothwell was designed as a high status residence for a high powered family. Walter Murray inherited the land in 1242 from his father-in-law, Walter Olifard, and wanted a grand residence to befit the family's high social status. However, his plans were never finished, possibly interrupted by Edward I's English invasion in 1296.

Timeline
1242
Walter Murray
begins building the mighty castle.

1296
Edward I
of England takes Bothwell during his first invasion of Scotland.

1301
Attacked Again
as Edward I deploys a great siege tower called 'le befefrey' (belfry).

1337
Scottish Defenders
dismantled the castle to prevent further English attacks.

1455
James II
overthrows the Black Douglas owners and Bothwell becomes a royal castle.

Late 1600's
Bothwell House
replaces
'The Most Magnificent Ruin in Scotland' Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
2. 'The Most Magnificent Ruin in Scotland' Marker
the now dilapidated castle.

(Captions)
The yellow areas show the sections of the castle that remained unfinished.
 
Location. 55° 48.572′ N, 4° 5.697′ W. Marker is in Bothwell, Scotland, in South Lanarkshire. Marker can be reached from Castle Avenue. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bothwell, Scotland G71 8BL, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 24 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Roman Military Bathhouse, Bothwellhaugh (approx. 4.4 kilometers away); Betrayed & Captured (approx. 11.3 kilometers away); Wallace's Well (approx. 11.3 kilometers away); Spirit of Scotland Monument (approx. 22.9 kilometers away); Battle of Loudoun Hill (approx. 22.9 kilometers away).
 
Also see . . .  Historic Scotland- Bothwell Castle. (Submitted on September 1, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
Bothwell Castle Interior image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
3. Bothwell Castle Interior
Interior of castle looking West. Marker in distance right (yellow arrow)
Bothwell Castle Interior image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
4. Bothwell Castle Interior
Interior of castle looking East. Marker in distance left (yellow arrow)
Northeast View of Bothwell Castle image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
5. Northeast View of Bothwell Castle
Southeast Tower image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
6. Southeast Tower
Bothwell Castle Painting image. Click for full size.
By Paul Sandby, circa 1780
7. Bothwell Castle Painting
From across the River Clyde
River Clyde image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
8. River Clyde
The River Clyde as it runs adjacent to the castle.
Bothwell Castle Tower Spiral Stairs image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
9. Bothwell Castle Tower Spiral Stairs
Interpretive Signs describing the History of Bothwell Castle image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
10. Interpretive Signs describing the History of Bothwell Castle
Trebuchet Balls image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 31, 2013
11. Trebuchet Balls
Bothwell Castle has a long history of battles and sieges. These trebuchet balls on display were found in the castle as evidence of its violent past.

Made from sandstone, they were used as ammunition for siege engines called trebuchets (from trebucher meaning 'to throw over' in medieval French). During an assault, trebuchets were used to destroy the castle walls by catapulting the balls at them.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 446 times since then and 86 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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