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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dayton in Sheridan County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Hogback

 
 
Hogback Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
1. Hogback Marker
Inscription.
About 500 million years ago the air and land were warmer, and seas covered all of Wyoming including the area you see. You would not recognize any animal life at that time. None of it lived on the land. Then around 75 million years ago, the earth’s crust began to grind together. The earth buckled, heaved, and the Big Horn Mountains were formed.

The long sharp red ridges in front of you are called “Hogbacks.” Other geological formations to look for are steep escarpments, sheer almost vertical sides caused by the fault that runs along this side of the Big Horn Mountains, synclines, downfolds in the earth’s crust that cause valleys, and Cuestas, long gentle upslopes of alternating hard and soft rocks.
 
Erected by Bighorn National Forest.
 
Location. 44° 49.673′ N, 107° 19.698′ W. Marker is in Dayton, Wyoming, in Sheridan County. Marker is on U.S. 14, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Dayton WY 82836, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Syncline Thrust Fault (approx. half a mile away); Fallen City (approx. 1.6 miles away); Dayton Community Hall
Hogback Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
2. Hogback Marker
(approx. 4.6 miles away); First Woman Mayor in Wyoming (approx. 4.6 miles away); Tongue River Crossing (approx. 6.7 miles away); Stagecoach Roads in Sheridan County (approx. 6.7 miles away); Bozeman Trail (approx. 6.8 miles away); Ohlman Postoffice and Stage Station (approx. 7.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Dayton.
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
Marker in Bighorn National Forest image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
3. Marker in Bighorn National Forest
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 157 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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