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Middletown in New Castle County, Delaware — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Former Site of the Alston and Hunn Farms

 
 
Former Site of the Alston and Hunn Farms Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Ben Urban, September 8, 2015
1. Former Site of the Alston and Hunn Farms Marker
Inscription. Near this location were the farms of John Alston (1794-1872) and John Hunn (1818-1894), cousins who shared the Quaker faith and were well documented operatives on Delaware's Underground Railroad. John Alston sometimes employed fugitives as laborers on his farm and in 1850, sheltered a young woman named Molly who was later captured there by bounty hunters. In his diaries, Alston wrote this prayer, "Enable me to keep my heart and house open to receive thy servants that they may rest in their travels." The most notable act of civil disobedience to take place at Hunn's farm occurred in December 1845 when Samuel D. Burris, a free African American man from Kent County, DE led a group of twelve fugitives escaping from Queen Anne's County, MD to Hunn's farm. Pursued by bounty hunters on their way north to freedom, the group included Samuel and Emeline Hawkins, along with their six children. For abetting their escape, an illegal activity according to the laws of the time, Hunn was sued by the owners and severely fined. The expense caused Hunn to lose his farm and other assets. He continued with his Underground Railroad activities in Delaware until the outbreak of the Civil War. After the Union Navy captured the South Carolina Sea Island in 1862, Hunn relocated there, and continued his work aiding the newly freed. In 1872 Hunn wrote, "I ask no
Former Site of the Alston and Hunn Farms Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Ben Urban, September 8, 2015
2. Former Site of the Alston and Hunn Farms Marker
other reward for any efforts made by me in the cause than to feel I have been of service to my fellow-men."
 
Erected 2015 by Delaware Public Archives. (Marker Number NC-210.)
 
Location. 39° 27.071′ N, 75° 41.501′ W. Marker is in Middletown, Delaware, in New Castle County. Marker is on East Main Street (County Route 299) near Dove Run Blvd, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Located at Middletown High School (120 Silver Lake Rd, Middletown, DE), northern side which boarders Route 299/E. Main St. Marker is in this post office area: Middletown DE 19709, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Middletown (approx. 1.4 miles away); Middletown Academy (approx. 1.4 miles away); Sgt. William Lloyd Nelson (approx. 1.4 miles away); Union Lodge No. 5 A.F.&A.M. (approx. 1.5 miles away); Old St. Anne's (approx. 1.5 miles away); This Tree Was Living When William Penn Came to Pennsylvania (approx. 1.6 miles away); Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House (approx. 1.6 miles away); Three Welsh Members (approx. 1.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Middletown.
 
Also see . . .  Middletown Transcript Newspaper. Memorial to recognize Middletown
Former Site of the Alston and Hunn Farms Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Ben Urban, September 9, 2015
3. Former Site of the Alston and Hunn Farms Marker
as Underground Railroad stop (Submitted on September 8, 2015, by John Ben Urban of Middletown, Delaware.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican Americans
 
A Bench by the Road image. Click for full size.
By John Ben Urban, September 8, 2015
4. A Bench by the Road
A Bench by the Road image. Click for full size.
By John Ben Urban, September 8, 2015
5. A Bench by the Road
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by John Ben Urban of Middletown, Delaware. This page has been viewed 252 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by John Ben Urban of Middletown, Delaware.   3. submitted on , by John Ben Urban of Middletown, Delaware.   4, 5. submitted on , by John Ben Urban of Middletown, Delaware. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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