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Nancy in Pulaski County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

A Hard March

Mill Springs Battlefield

 
 
A Hard March Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 9, 2015
1. A Hard March Marker
Inscription. In November 1861, the Confederate army commanded by General Felix Zollicoffer arrived in Mill Springs, Kentucky, on the south side of the Cumberland River. A month later, Zollicoffer had moved 6,000 men to the north side of Cumberland and constructed a line of fortifications a mile long. Union General Don Carlos Buell, commander of the Army of the Ohio, ordered General George Thomas to find Zollicoffer’s army and destroy it.

On December 31, 1861, Thomas and about 3,000 men left Lebanon, Kentucky, and marched to this place, then known as Logan’s Crossroads. Under normal circumstances, his soldiers would have covered the sixty-five miles in two or three days. But heavy winter rains turned roads into ankle-deep mud, and the trip stretched to over two weeks. His men—wet, cold and hungry—arrived here on January 17, 1862.

Upon his arrival, Thomas ordered General Albin Schoepf at Somerset to bring his men up from the village eight miles away. Schoepf’s men forded swollen Fishing Creek and joined Thomas a day later. The Confederates arrived the day after that.

When the battle began, Thomas rode to the hilltop where Mill Springs National Cemetery is now. Dressed in his new brigadier’s uniform, Thomas ordered the 2nd Minnesota and 9th Ohio regiments forward. He then rode toward the sound of fighting.
A Hard March Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 9, 2015
2. A Hard March Marker
View to the south towards the battlefield
From what is now Zollicoffer Park, Thomas directed his troops at the Battle of Mill Springs.


Around noon a heavy rain began to fall in such torrents that it blinded our eyes. The wagons cut up the road and the mud in some places was six to eight inches deep.
– A soldier of the 10th Kentucky Infantry, (U.S.)
 
Erected by Mill Springs Battlefield Association.
 
Location. 37° 4.127′ N, 84° 44.155′ W. Marker is in Nancy, Kentucky, in Pulaski County. Marker can be reached from State Highway 80 0.3 miles east of State Highway 235, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located near the entrance to the Mill Springs Battlefield Visitor Center & Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9020 Kentucky 80, Nancy KY 42544, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate Defense Line (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named "A Hard March" (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing); A National Cemetery System (about 500 feet away); Mill Springs National Cemetery (about 500 feet away); Balie Peyton, Jr. (1833-1862)
A Hard March and Confederate Defense Line Markers image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 9, 2015
3. A Hard March and Confederate Defense Line Markers
Located near the entrance to the
Mill Springs Battlefield Visitor Center & Museum
(approx. 0.9 miles away); "Battle on a Sabbath Morn" (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Union Line at the Fence (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Ravine (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Nancy.
 
Also see . . .  Experience Mill Springs Battlefield. Official website of the Mill Springs Battlefield Association. (Submitted on September 10, 2015.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Mill Springs Battlefield Visitor Center & Museum image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 9, 2015
4. Mill Springs Battlefield Visitor Center & Museum
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 113 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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