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Perryville in Boyle County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Cleburne's Advance

Perryville

 

—The Battle for Kentucky October 8, 1862 —

 
Cleburne's Advance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 31, 2012
1. Cleburne's Advance Marker
Inscription.
Forced back from the hills above Doctor's Creek, the Union soldiers retreated to this position. Their lines were in chaos - regiments intermingled, the wounded were left behind and some panicked troops raced for the rear. Most soldiers, however, continued to stubbornly defy the Southern advance.

With ammunition running low, the Federal troops hastily reformed their lines on this ridge. As they had done all over the battlefield, the Union army used successive hilltops to establish new battle lines. Driven off one hill, the Federal troops reformed on another. It was a strategy that helped stem the crushing tide of the Confederate advance.

Leading the assault against the Union troops was a Southern brigade commanded by Brigadier General Patrick Cleburne. Their blue and white battle flags flapping in the October wind, Cleburne's infantry again bore down upon the Union line.

When Cleburne sent his flag-bearers in front of his main line as a decoy, the Union infantry fired their one-shot muskets at these troops. With their guns emptied, the Federal soldiers were then torn apart when Cleburne's main line appeared. The gun smoke rolled along in waves as the Confederate infantry shattered the Union position.

Against Cleburne's intense attack, the Union lines broke. The blue-clad soldiers fell back
Cleburne's Advance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 31, 2012
2. Cleburne's Advance Marker
to the ridges behind you, which became the third and final position. With night falling, the Federal soldiers formed a line of battle. They knew that another retreat would lead to a crushing defeat.

(Caption)
(upper right) Wounded in the face two months before this battle, Confederate Brigadier General Patrick Cleburne was again wounded at Perryville. While riding his horse, Dixie, near this spot, a solid cannonball struck and killed the horse, and injured Cleburne's ankle. Despite the wound, Cleburne advanced on foot with his soldiers. (Marker Number 20.)
 
Location. 37° 40.102′ N, 84° 58.556′ W. Marker is in Perryville, Kentucky, in Boyle County. Marker can be reached from Hays Mays Road 0.3 miles south of Whites Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Perryville KY 40468, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Widow Gibson Cabin (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); “For God’s Sake, Save That Battery” The 38th Indiana at Perryville (approx. 0.2 miles away); Russell House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Defense of Loomis’ Heights (approx. 0.2 miles away); Simonson’s Battery
Cleburne's Advance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 31, 2012
3. Cleburne's Advance Marker
Route of Cleburne's Advance (yellow outline arrow)
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Harris' Battery (approx. 0.2 miles away); General Polk Behind Enemy Lines (approx. 0.2 miles away); Artillery Duel at Loomis Heights (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Perryville.
 
Also see . . .  Perryville Battlefield State Historic Site. Kentucky Department of Parks (Submitted on September 11, 2015.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Cleburne's Advance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 31, 2012
4. Cleburne's Advance Marker
Marker at right (yellow arrow)
Patrick Cleburne image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher
5. Patrick Cleburne
Cleburne's Advance image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 31, 2012
6. Cleburne's Advance
Cleburne's view of the advance (yellow outlined arrow). Marker can be seen in distance (yellow arrow)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 219 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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