Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Melrose in Scottish Borders, Scotland, United Kingdom
 

Royal Connections

Melrose Abbey

 
 
Royal Connections Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
1. Royal Connections Marker
Inscription. For centuries, Melrose Abbey was connected to the Scottish Crown. While it never gained the regal position of Iona or Dunfermline, its location close to England and association with kings has given it a special place in Scottish history.

David I

David was instrumental in inviting the pious Cistercians to Melrose. The abbey's location on the border with England sent a strong message about the wealth, power and worldliness of the Scottish king.

(Caption:) Above: David was a great patron of the monastic orders. He founded more than a dozen monasteries between 1124 and 1153.

Robert I

During the Wars of Independence, Melrose's location near the border put it at risk from the fighting. After the church was damaged in 1322, Robert the Bruce helped pay for it to be rebuilt. Before his death Robert instructed that his heart be buried here.

(Caption:)Right: While the body of Robert the Bruce was interred at Dunfermline Abbey, Robert's heart was buried in Melrose.

Alexander II

In 1294 Alexander broke the tradition of royal burials at Iona and Dunfermline Abbeys, by asking to be buried at Melrose. After he died whilst campaigning against the Norse, his body was brought here from Argyll. Burial at Melrose never caught on with later monarchs.

(Caption:)
The Heart of Robert the Bruce Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
2. The Heart of Robert the Bruce Marker
A Noble Hart May Have Nane Ease
Gif Freedom Failye


The Royal Seal of Alexander II - Alexander was an active king, campaigning in Argyll, Galloway and Moray.

Richard II of England

Melrose was again at the center of conflict with England in 1385, when the English monarch laid to waste Scotland's border region. Although Melrose was 'burnt down with fiery flames', rebuilding began almost immediately. Funding was provided by Richard II himself, perhaps because he now viewed Southern Scotland as conquered or perhaps to salve his conscience.
 
Location. 55° 35.961′ N, 2° 43.067′ W. Marker is in Melrose, Scotland, in Scottish Borders. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Abbey Road and Cloisters Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Melrose, Scotland TD6 9LG, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 10 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Scott's View (approx. 4.5 kilometers away); An Eccentric Vision (approx. 4.5 kilometers away); The Fletcher Monument (approx. 9.4 kilometers away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Melrose Abbey and the mystery of Robert the Bruce's heart. (Submitted on July 24, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.)
2. Scotland's History- Douglas and the Bruce's heart. (Submitted on July 24, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.)
3. Historic Scotland- Melrose Abbey. Melrose Abbey is a magnificent ruin on a grand scale, with lavishly decorated masonry.... It was
The Heart of Robert the Bruce Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
3. The Heart of Robert the Bruce Marker
The casket said to contain the Robert the Bruce's heart was investigated in 1996. Inside the casket was another casket reading, "The enclosed leaden casket containing a heart was found beneath Chapter House floor, March 1921, by His Majesty's Office of Works". Since there were no other reports or records of hearts being buried in Melrose, the container was buried in 1998 and marked with the above stone.
founded by King David I in 1136, as the first Cistercian monastery in Scotland. The spot was chosen due to its association with the early Christian monastery at nearby Old Melrose founded by St Aidan in about 640.... The abbey grew rich on the wool trade, suffered through the Wars of Independence, and was substantially rebuilt in the 1380s. It continued in use as an abbey until the Protestant Reformation of 1560. After that, the existing monks were allowed to stay on: the last one died in 1590.... The abbey is the burial place of Robert the Bruce’s heart, which is marked with a commemorative carved stone plaque. Visitors can also visit a small museum housing a display of artefacts found within the abbey.
(Submitted on July 24, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Wars, Non-US
 
Melrose Abbey image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
4. Melrose Abbey
In relation to Melrose Abbey, see marker left-center
Melrose Abbey and Monument Marking the Burial Spot of the Heart of Robert the Bruce image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
5. Melrose Abbey and Monument Marking the Burial Spot of the Heart of Robert the Bruce
Melrose Abbey image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
6. Melrose Abbey
Melrose Abbey Information image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
7. Melrose Abbey Information
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 210 times since then and 15 times this year. Last updated on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement