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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Hunter in Montgomery County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Once A Farm

Schoharie Crossing

 

—State Historic Site —

 
Once A Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
1. Once A Farm Marker
Inscription.
Along with remnants of an English fort, a Mohawk village, and the original Erie Canal, this location also contains features that echo back to the time when the hamlet of Fort Hunter was an agricultural community. Two modest farm houses, a corn crib, and the foundations of a barn that burned down in 1969 are all that remain of the Enders family barn.

According to the 1855 census, the Enders farm was 522 acres. The family grew broom corn, wheat, potatoes, peas, oats, and applies, and raised sheep for wool and cows for milk and butter. Broom corn was an important crop for the Fort Hunter area.

The Erie Canal opened the Mohawk Valley and the wilderness of New York State for commerce, allowing for easy transport of both industrial and agricultural products throughout the 19th century. Today Fort Hunter is mainly a bedroom community whose residents commute to surrounding towns and cities.

The 1834 Holmes Hutchinson map depicts the area around the Erie Canal's Guard Lock. The Enders House, built ca 1800. may have been used as a canal store. The map also shows a blacksmith shop, and a toll house adjacent to the lock and house.

This ca. 1880 photograph of the Enders farm shows the Schoharie Creek retaining wall and the home that stood at this location before the farmhouse that is now
Once A Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
2. Once A Farm Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a detail from the Holmes Hutchinson map and survey of the Erie Canal in the area around the Erie Canal's Guard Lock.
how to the Visitor Center. Although we do not know what happened to the original farmhouse, we do know that the second farmhouse in this location was standing in 1900.


This 1950s aerial photograph shows the Visitor Center, corn crib, farm yard, and barns. At this time there were rental apartments in the farmhouse. The barn burned down in 1969.

Broom corn is a type of sorghum in the same family as wheat. The branches of its flowering head were fashioned into brooms. The Shakers began production of broom corn New York State in 1790. The Mohawk Valley was the center of this thriving agricultural industry.
 
Location. 42° 56.38′ N, 74° 16.957′ W. Marker is in Fort Hunter, New York, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Schoharie Street south of Main Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. This marker is on the site of the grounds of the Schoharie Crossing, State Historic Site, just north of the State Historic Site Visitor Center, between the Visitor Center and the visitor's parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Hunter NY 12069, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. In the Wake of Hurricane Irene (a few steps from this marker); The Fort by the Village (within shouting distance of this
Once A Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
3. Once A Farm Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a ca. 1880 photograph of the Enders farm showing the Schoharie Creek retaining wall and the home that stood at this location before the farmhouse that is now home to the Visitor Center.
marker); Building Block of the Erie Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Original Erie Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Queen Anne Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); East Guard Lock (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Last Mohawk Indian Village (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of First Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Hunter.
 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Once A Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
4. Once A Farm Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a 1950s aerial photograph showing the farmhouse that eventually became the Visitor Center of today.
Once A Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
5. Once A Farm Marker
View of the marker, looking east, in the direction of the foundational remains of the barn that burned down in 1969.
Once A Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
6. Once A Farm Marker
View of the marker, looking south along the Schoharie Street sidewalk, towards the Historic Site Visitor's Center.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 136 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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