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Lakeside in San Diego County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Mexican Grant

Commemorating Caņada de Los Coches Rancho,

 

—Smallest Mexican Land Grant in Calif. —

 
Mexican Grant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, April 5, 2009
1. Mexican Grant Marker
Inscription.
Mexican Grant
Commemorating
Caņada de Los Coches Rancho
Smallest Mexican Grant in Calif.
--------
Granted in 1843 to Apolinaria Lorenzana
-- by --
Governor Manuel Micheltorena
-- Site of Old - Gristmill --

 
Erected 1948 by Native Sons of the Golden West. (Marker Number 425.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 32° 50.183′ N, 116° 54.017′ W. Marker is in Lakeside, California, in San Diego County. Marker is on East Main Street (Business Interstate 8). Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13468 East Main Street, Lakeside CA 92040, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lakeside Auto Speedway (1907) (approx. 2 miles away); Historic El Cajon Hall (approx. 4.5 miles away); Amaziah Lord Knox (approx. 4.6 miles away); KCBQ “Top 40” Personalities (approx. 5.5 miles away); Mission Dam and Flume (approx. 8.2 miles away); Bancroft Ranch House (approx. 8.6 miles away); San Diego State University (approx. 11 miles away); Flint Farm (approx. 11.7 miles away).
 
More about this marker.
Mexican Grant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dana Law, December 26, 2009
2. Mexican Grant Marker
At the entrance to an RV/ Mobile home park. Above the street under a tree on the north east corner.
 
Regarding Mexican Grant. From the San Diego Historical Society: La Caņada de los Coches Rancho," or "The Vale of the Hogs," Ranch.
Only 28.39 acres in area, and the smallest of local land grants made during the Mexican period, this was originally part of the El Cajon Rancho of the San Diego Mission. In 1843 Governor Manuel Micheltorena granted it to Seņorita Apolinaria Lorenzana, who held it for the Mission when all church lands were being distributed to land seekers.

While Jamacha Rancho was split into various undivided interests, making a subdivision of the tract inevitable, ownership of the property had become even more confused and complex as a result of action taken by Doņa Apolinaria Lorenzana. On December 31, 1878, Doņa Apolinaria had conveyed the ranchos of Jamacha, Los Coches, and San Juan de Secua, to Monica Romero de Ruiz of Santa Barbara. However, she no longer held legal title to the three ranchos, having sold San Juan de Secua in the 1830s, and Los Coches and Jamacha, following the American conquest.80 How Lorenzana justified the sale of land she no longer possessed is not known. Considering her pious reputation, it seems unlikely she had fraudulent intentions. Doņa Apolinaria must have believed that she still
Mexican Grant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dana Law, December 26, 2009
3. Mexican Grant Marker
owned the three ranchos, perhaps as a result of the final confirmation of her claim to Jamacha in 1871.
Captain Jesse Wilbur Ames, who was baptized in California into the Catholic faith as Jesse Julian Ames, obtained the property in the 1850's. Before he built his Mexican style ranch house on it, the ranch became a stop on the San Antonio-San Diego Mail Route.
Don Juliano Ames, as his neighbors called him, planted a double cactus hedge along the boundaries and raised sheep and cattle. One of the early growers of grain in this part of the country, he erected a flour mill. He constructed a dam to assure his water supply, made the best soap south of Los Angeles, opened a blacksmith shop, made lime for whitewash, and served the area in many well-appreciated ways.
His fine adobe home was destroyed years ago, through the activity of vandals following up stories of great wealth being hidden in it.
 
Categories. 20th CenturyHispanic AmericansNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Mexican Grant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, March 31, 2015
4. Mexican Grant Marker
Photo of area from San Diego Historical Society image. Click for full size.
5. Photo of area from San Diego Historical Society
Site of the Caņada de Los Coches Rancho Land Grant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, April 5, 2009
6. Site of the Caņada de Los Coches Rancho Land Grant Marker
Mexican Grant Marker Dedication image. Click for full size.
circa 1948
7. Mexican Grant Marker Dedication
My Grandfather Daniel Contreras who with other members of the Native Sons of the Golden West constructed the mile marker. Picture taken on the day of dedication. Picture taken by Sara Contreras
Site of the Caņada de Los Coches Rancho Land Grant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, April 5, 2009
8. Site of the Caņada de Los Coches Rancho Land Grant Marker
Site of the Caņada de Los Coches Rancho Land Grant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, April 5, 2009
9. Site of the Caņada de Los Coches Rancho Land Grant Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dana Law of El Cajon, California. This page has been viewed 1,456 times since then and 50 times this year. Last updated on , by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   2, 3. submitted on , by Dana Law of El Cajon, California.   4. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   5. submitted on , by Dana Law of El Cajon, California.   6. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   7. submitted on , by Teresa Forsythe of Charlotte, North Carolina.   8, 9. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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