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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Yellowstone National Park in Park County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Cooking Hillside

 
 
Cooking Hillside Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2015
1. Cooking Hillside Marker
Inscription.
Shake, then Bake
Covered by dense forest until 1978, this hillside changed dramatically after a swarm of earthquakes struck the area. In spite of being jolted again and again, the trees remained standing, but met their demise soon afterward when ground temperatures soared to 200 F or 94 C!

Roots sizzled in the super-heated soil and trees toppled over one by one as steam rose eerily between the branches. No wonder the hill was dubbed “Cooking Hillside.”
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 44° 37.416′ N, 110° 25.979′ W. Marker is in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, in Park County. Marker is on Grand Loop Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located on a path at the Mud Volcano area. Marker is in this post office area: Yellowstone National Park WY 82190, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mud Geyser (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dragon's Mouth Spring (about 500 feet away); Mud Volcano (about 500 feet away); Grizzly Fumarole (about 700 feet away); Churning Caldron (approx.
Cooking Hillside Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2015
2. Cooking Hillside Marker
0.2 miles away); Black Dragons Caldron (approx. mile away); Volcanic Landscape (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sulphur Caldron (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Yellowstone National Park.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker features a photograph of the hillside. Two “before and after” photos appear on the right side of the marker under the heading “Vanishing Pines”. The top one has a caption of “As seen in this aerial photograph, thick woodlands grew here before 1987.” The second photo has the caption “In 1978 and 1979, numerous trees died in the smoldering ground, leaving behind their fallen trunks as a reminder of their once stately presence.”
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
Cooking Hillside image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2015
3. Cooking Hillside
Many of the dead trees and the thermal features that led to their demise can be seen in this photo that was taken near the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 150 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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