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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Yellowstone National Park in Park County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

A Golden Opportunity / Mission 66 in Yellowstone / The Mission Continues

 
 
A Golden Opportunity Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2015
1. A Golden Opportunity Marker
Inscription.
A Golden Opportunity
When Yellowstone became the world’s first national park in 1872, only 300 people reached its borders.
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For decades, traveling to Yellowstone and other remote parks remained slow and expensive.

Privately owned automobiles – the wave of the future – were first permitted in Yellowstone in 1915, but few people owned them then. In 1916, the year the National Park Service was created as a federal agency, nearly 36,000 visitors enjoyed traveling in Yellowstone.

After World War II, new highways stretched across the country and automobiles became affordable for many families, leading vacationers on new adventures. Road trips became a pastime, and national parks grew in popularity as affordable destinations. In 1948, three years after the war ended, the number of visitors to Yellowstone skyrocketed to more than a million.

But during the war years, national parks had suffered from a lack of funds. The visitors who arrived in Yellowstone in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s found structures had fallen into disrepair, and far too few services existed to accommodate growing crowds. As more and more people traveled to their national parks, they marveled at spectacular scenery and historic structures, but they needed basic
Mission 66 in Yellowstone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2015
2. Mission 66 in Yellowstone Marker
services.

Mission 66 in Yellowstone
In 1955, the National Park Service embarked on an ambitious federal plan. During the coming decade, additional roads, bridges, visitor centers, campgrounds, lodges, restaurants, restrooms, trails, and other public services would be built in national parks. The National Park Service Director set a goal for completion in 1966 – the 50th Anniversary of the National Park Service.

The Mission 66 program would eventually be the largest capital investment made in the history of the National Park Service, providing the infrastructure that would serve a generation of visitors and beyond.
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In the spirit of post-war modernization, new structures would be built with a modern flair rather than traditional nature-inspired buildings. In large parks, visitor services would be grouped for convenience in scenic landscapes. In large parks, visitor services would be grouped for convenience near popular destinations and park visitor centers, allowing for modern amenities and cultural resources to visitors.

In addition to modern services and interpretation, the goal of Yellowstone’s Mission 66 program was to move development away from important resources. The scenic area near Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River received rapid attention, and a new village laid out in a convenient
The Mission Continues Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2015
3. The Mission Continues Marker
complex was quickly constructed. The village, set back from the canyon, replaced buildings scattered along the canyon rim, restoring spectacular scenery.

The Mission Continues
Tailored for the independent auto traveler, Canyon Lodge opened for business in 1957, complete with cafeteria and 500 motel cabins. For more than half a century, the cabins offered affordable accommodations to Yellowstone visitors.
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The simple and unadorned rustic architectural style of the buildings during the Mission 66 period has come to be called “NPS Modern.” It was a noted departure from the traditional park service “rustic” and was intended to modernize the post WWII visitor experience. Notice the straight lines and modern commercial look of the buildings arranged in a horseshoe pattern around the large parking lot. This development around you is the most prominent example of Mission 66 architecture in Yellowstone.

The Loop A and Loop C Canyon Cabins were temporary structures built in the early 1950’s. They were one of the very first Mission 66 projects in the entire National Park Service. Affectionately referred to as “brownies” by staff and visitors, the square, flat-roofed cabins represent earliest attempts to provide modern style accommodations to visitors. The cabins have served their
A Golden Opportunity / Mission 66 in Yellowstone / The Mission Continues Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2015
4. A Golden Opportunity / Mission 66 in Yellowstone / The Mission Continues Marker
purpose but are being replaced by modern lodges. To mitigate for the loss of these historic cabins, Yellowstone has committed to a multi-year rehabilitation of the Canyon Lodge and Registration buildings to restore them to their 1960’s grandeur; reestablishing the modernist features so characteristic of the post-WWII era in American history.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 44° 44.053′ N, 110° 29.382′ W. Marker is in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, in Park County. Marker is on Grand Loop Road, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. This a a set of three markers, and is located in Canyon Village near the restaurants. Marker is in this post office area: Yellowstone National Park WY 82190, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mission 66 (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Grand View (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone (approx. 0.8 miles away); Lookout Point (approx. 0.9 miles away); Waterfall Makers (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone (approx. one mile away); Still Venting After All These Years (approx. one mile away); Canyon Colors (approx. one mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Yellowstone National Park.
 
More about this marker.
Marker in Canyon Village image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2015
5. Marker in Canyon Village
Several photographs of Yellowstone in the early years and the Canyon Area facilities appear on the markers.
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Three Marker Set image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2015
6. Three Marker Set
Canyon Visitor Education Center image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2015
7. Canyon Visitor Education Center
Canyon Lodge Facility image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2015
8. Canyon Lodge Facility
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 159 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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