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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Olympia in Thurston County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Marking the End of the Oregon Trail 1844

 
 
Marking the End of the Oregon Trail 1844 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shirley A Stirling, 2013
1. Marking the End of the Oregon Trail 1844 Marker
Inscription. (Marker title is inscription.)
 
Erected 1913 by Sacajawea Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, Olympia, Washington.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Oregon Trail marker series.
 
Location. 47° 2.585′ N, 122° 54.068′ W. Marker is in Olympia, Washington, in Thurston County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Capitol Way South and Legion Way SE. Click for map. Marker is in the northwest corner of Sylvester Park. Marker is in this post office area: Olympia WA 98501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John Rankin Rogers (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington Women Win the Vote (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); POW AND MIA Monument (approx. half a mile away); The Medal of Honor Monument (approx. half a mile away); Masonic Lodge 1854-1971, (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Lone Tree (approx. 0.9 miles away); Ecological Connections (approx. 11.8 miles away); Mima Mounds: A Special Prairie (approx. 11.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Olympia.
 
Regarding Marking the End of the Oregon Trail 1844. In 1913,
Marking the End of the Oregon Trail 1844 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shirley A Stirling, June 8, 2013
2. Marking the End of the Oregon Trail 1844 Marker
Washington State Governor Ernest Lister accepted an Oregon Trail monument on behalf of the State of Washington. The Sacajawea Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) of Olympia, Washington donated a native granite boulder that was installed with a bronze plaque marking the end of the Oregon Trail. The DAR and Ezra Meeker were interested in honoring the Oregon Trail pioneers who reached Puget Sound; documenting and preserving the Oregon Trail; promoting a national highway across the country; and attempting to rename the ‘Pacific Highway’ to ‘Pioneer Way’, the road that originally took travelers from the Columbia River to Puget Sound.
The Sacajawea Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution was organized by thirteen Olympia women in 1905, with a charter was granted by the National Society in 1906.
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Shirley A Stirling of Lacey, Washington. This page has been viewed 215 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Shirley A Stirling of Lacey, Washington. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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