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Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jackson's Command

Rodes’ Brigade, D.H. Hill's Division

 

—Brig. Gen. R.E. Rodes, Commanding —

 
Jackson's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
1. Jackson's Command Marker
Inscription.
Organization
3rd Alabama Infantry
5th Alabama Infantry
6th Alabama Infantry
12th Alabama Infantry
26th Alabama Infantry
September 17, 1862

On the night of September 16, Rodes' Brigade bivouacked in the field east of Piper's house. On the morning of the 17th it moved to the Bloody Lane, its center a few feet north of this point.

Supported by the brigade of G.B. Anderson on the right and by remnants of the brigades of Colquitt and Garland on the left, it withstood several assaults of French's Division of Sumner's Corps, but its right flank having been turned by the advance of Richardson's Division. It was compelled to retire in the direction of Sharpsburg.
 
Erected by United States War Department. (Marker Number 338.)
 
Location. 39° 28.283′ N, 77° 44.45′ W. Marker is in Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Bloody Lane, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. French's Division, Second Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); 5th Maryland Infantry (a few steps from
Jackson's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Jackson's Command Marker
this marker); Second Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Second Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); 130th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Sixth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Second Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); 1st Delaware Volunteers (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Sixth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam National Battlefield (U.S. Park Service). 23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing after twelve hours of savage combat on September 17, 1862. The Battle of Antietam ended the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia's first invasion into the North and led to Abraham Lincoln's issuance of the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.
Jackson's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
3. Jackson's Command Marker
(Submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Robert E. Rodes. Robert Emmett Rodes (March 29, 1829 – September 19, 1864) was one of the youngest Confederate generals in the American Civil War, and the first of Robert E. Lee's divisional commanders not trained at West Point. (Submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. 3rd Regiment Alabama Infantry. The 3rd Alabama consisted mainly of men from the Alabama counties of Autauga, Coosa, Lowndes, Macon, Mobile and Montgomery. (Submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. 5th Alabama Infantry Regiment. Its companies were from the counties of Barbour, Clarke, Lowndes, Talladega, Dallas, Sumter, Monroe, Greene, and Pickens. (Submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. 6th Alabama Infantry Regiment. Its twelve companies were recruited in the counties of Montgomery, Jackson, Autuaga, Lowndes, Russell, Macon, Henry, and Wilson. (Submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. 12th Alabama Infantry Regiment. Its members were from Montgomery and Mobile, and the counties of Coosa, Pike, Coffee, De Kalb, Macon, Jackson, and Morgan. (Submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. 26th Alabama Infantry Regiment (O'Neal's). The
Brig. General Robert E. Rodes (1829-1864) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
4. Brig. General Robert E. Rodes (1829-1864)
Rodes commanded one of two brigades that held the Union assault on the sunken road, or "Bloody Lane," suffering heavy casualties. Rodes was lightly wounded by shell fragments.
men were from Walker, Winston, Tuscaloosa, Marion, and Fayette counties. (Submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 189 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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