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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maumee in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Battle of Fallen Timbers

 
 
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
1. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
Inscription.
This monument and nine-acre site commemorates the Battle of Fallen Timbers, fought August 20, 1794, between a confederation of Indian tribes and General Anthony Wayne’s Legion of the United States.

Treaty of Greenville   1795
General Anthony Wayne’s victory at this battle led to the 1795 Treaty of Greenville. In the treaty, tribes retained northwest Ohio as Indian land, except for several reserves granted to the United States.

One was a 12-mile square, surrounding the foot of the rapids, where military and trading activities led to early settlement of Maumee and Perrysburg.

The treaty opened the rest of Ohio to the United States.

For over 150 years, historians believed the battle was fought entirely on the floodplain of the Maumee River. Recent archaeological and scholarly investigation demonstrates that the most significant portion of the battle was fought on high ground, near the present-day US 23/24 interchange. The portion of the battle fought on the floodplain was in the vicinity of present-day Metropark near the foot of the rapids on the Maumee River.

< Reverse Side : >
Fallen Timbers Battlefield Memorial Park & Fort Miamis National Historic Site
This park commemorates battles and treaties with the British and American Indians that led to
Reverse Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
2. Reverse Side of Marker
the westward expansion of the United States and statehood of Ohio.

In the 1790s, residents of the newly formed United States were starting to move west into the Northwest Territory, a region controlled by American Indians and claimed by the British. To protect settlers, President George Washington sent General Anthony Wayne and a force of about 3,000 regulars and militia into the territory to build a series of forts between the Ohio and Maumee rivers. Waiting for them were about 1,000 warriors. Wayne’s decisive victory in the battle led to other conflicts, treaties, and eventually the War of 1812 with the British. The United States ultimately gained control of the territory.
To learn more about these historic events, visit all three of the park’s sites in Maumee.

Fallen Timbers Battlefield
The Fallen Timbers Battlefield consists of 187 acres of open fields and a wooded area at the intersection of US 23 and I-475. Archaeological explorations and historical research in the 1980s and 1990s revealed that this area was the actual site of the 1794 battle between U.S. troops and American Indians.

Fallen Timbers Battlefield Memorial Park
The Fallen Timbers Battlefield Memorial Park is connected to the battlefield by a bike-pedestrian bridge over US 24, the Anthony Wayne Trail.
A bronze statue of General Wayne is located on
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
3. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
a bluff overlooking the Maumee River in Side Cut Metropark. For many years the battle was thought to have occurred entirely on the bluff and the floodplain below.

Fort Miamis
Fort Miamis is located on River Road about four miles east of the battlefield. Earthen mounds you see today were part of the fort built in 1794 by the British to stop U.S. military advances in the Maumee Valley and to solidify American Indian support against westward spreading of U.S. settlements. The British later used the fort site in the War of 1812.
 
Location. 41° 32.639′ N, 83° 41.857′ W. Marker is in Maumee, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker is on Fallen Timbers Lane, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located in Fallen Timbers Battlefield Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Maumee OH 43537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fallen Timbers (a few steps from this marker); American Indians at the Battle of Fallen Timbers (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Turkey Foot Rock (about 300 feet away); Fallen Timbers Battle Memorial (about 400 feet away); Fallen Timbers Battle Monument
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
4. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
(about 400 feet away); Maumee River Rapids (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fighting Forces (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fallen Timbers Battlefield (approx. 0.4 miles away but has been reported missing). Click for a list of all markers in Maumee.
 
Categories. Native AmericansWar, US Revolutionary
 
Marker at the Fallen Timbers Battlefield Memorial Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
5. Marker at the Fallen Timbers Battlefield Memorial Park
Marker at the Fallen Timbers Battlefield Memorial Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
6. Marker at the Fallen Timbers Battlefield Memorial Park
Fallen Timbers Marker Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
7. Fallen Timbers Marker Battlefield
The most intense fighting of the battle took place at this site, located ½ mile north of he marker.
Battle of Fallen Timbers Monument Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
8. Battle of Fallen Timbers Monument Park
Battle of Fallen Timbers Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
9. Battle of Fallen Timbers Monument
Closeup of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
10. Closeup of Monument
Fort Miamis image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2015
11. Fort Miamis
The earthworks seen here were built by the British in 1794. They used it during the Fallen Timbers battle and during the War of 1812.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 229 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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