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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance

 
 
Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler
1. Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance Marker
Inscription. "When nothing else subsists from the past, after the people are dead, after the things are broken and scattered. The smell and taste of things remain poised a long time, like souls. Bearing resiliently, on tiny and almost impalpable drops of their essence, the immense edifice of memory”
Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance
On December 9, 1941 in a climate of fear and distrust from the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the Kuni Wada Bakery located at 1310 Madison Avenue was shut down. The two Japanese families, the Nakajimas and the Kawais who ran the bakery, were arrested and forced to leave Memphis. This remembrance attempts to honor the Bakery. The contributions of the Nakajimas and the Kawais to Memphis and to those whose lives were touched by a small bakery known for its exquisite doughnuts.
Sonjit Sethi 2007
This project is made possible by the UrbanArt Commission through the generous support of First Tennessee Bravo Awards, the Hyde Family Foundations, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Dupree Family Foundation, Waddell and Associates, the Tennessee Arts Commission, ArtsMemphis and the Memphis Area Transit Authority.
 
Erected 2007 by Memphis UrbanArt Commission.
 
Location. 35° 
Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance Marker next to Power Station image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, October 5, 2015
2. Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance Marker next to Power Station
8.353′ N, 90° 1.063′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker is on Madison Avenue just east of Claybrook Street. Click for map. The memorial is in a lot which contains a power unit for the Madison Avenue trolley line. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1310 Madison Avenue, Memphis TN 38104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jane Terrell Hospital (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Congregational Church (approx. 0.3 miles away but has been reported missing); St. John's United Methodist Church (approx. half a mile away); The Memphis 13/Bruce Elementary (approx. 0.6 miles away); Annesdale Park Subdivision (approx. 0.6 miles away); Bettis Family Cemetery (approx. 0.6 miles away); Central Gardens Historic District (approx. 0.9 miles away); Grace-St. Luke's Episcopal Church (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Memphis.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance. (Submitted on October 6, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee.)
2. World War II and Memphis, Tennessee. (Submitted on October 6, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee.)
3. Biography of Sanjit Sethi, designer of this monument. (Submitted on October 6, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee.)
 
Additional comments.
Back Side of Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, October 5, 2015
3. Back Side of Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance Marker
1.

When the work by Sanjit Sethi was installed, the box contained a system that spread a scent twice a day that smelled like bread baking in the area. The goal was for someone in the area smelling the scent to follow it to the marker, which remains at the site today.

From the Memphis Daily News, Nov. 1, 2012 By Bill Dries
    — Submitted October 6, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee.

 
Categories. Asian AmericansCivil RightsPeaceWar, World II
 
Wide View of Site of Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, October 5, 2015
4. Wide View of Site of Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 174 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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