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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Amargosa in Nye County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Jack's Stone Cabin

 
 
Jack's Stone Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Trev Meed, circa 2013
1. Jack's Stone Cabin Marker
Inscription. Looking for a protected, isolated place for a home, Jack Longstreet rode into Ash Meadows and found exactly what he was looking for- a clear spring, a cave in a spring mound, and open pasture for his horses. He enlarged the cave and built a stone cabin in front of the opening. The mound actually formed the back wall and part of the sides of the cabin. Longstreet and his second wife, Susie, lived at the house for about five years (1895-1899).

In 1984 a flash flood reduced Jack's cabin to rubble. Historic restoration experts painstakingly set each stone back in its original position based on photos taken early in the last century. Restoration concluded in 2006.

Photo Captions:
Concrete block coated with a sandy lime plaster replicates the spring mound that supported the cabin's back wall. This small cave opened into the lower spring mound providing a trickle of water. In addition to drinking water, Jack also stored perishable food in this naturally cool spot.

Longstreet epitomizes the mythical western frontiersman: Self-reliant, independent and fair-minded. Speaking with a southern drawl, he was quick with a pistol and never missed his mark. As his skill with a gun grew so did his reputation as a dangerous man. Trouble seemed to follow him and he often found it convenient to avoid his enemies
Jack Longstreet's Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Trev Meed, circa 2013
2. Jack Longstreet's Cabin
by living in out-of-the-way places. At the end of his life he was finally accepted as a gruff but kind man with exciting stories of his gunslinger days.

Photos like this from 1927 were helpful to restoration stone masons resetting the original stones.

Jack Longstreet 1928

 
Location. 36° 28.066′ N, 116° 19.576′ W. Marker is near Amargosa, Nevada, in Nye County. Marker can be reached from Longstreet Spring Road (dirt), on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker and cabin are located down a very short walking trail, just west of Longstreet Spring Road. The area where the walking trail starts is very easily located. A park informational kiosk and turn-out are located at this trail head. Marker is in this post office area: Amargosa Valley NV 89020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Amargosa Opera House (approx. 12.5 miles away in California); Death Valley Junction (approx. 12.5 miles away in California).
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Rear View of Jack Longstreet's Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Trev Meed, circa 2013
3. Rear View of Jack Longstreet's Cabin
Interior of Jack Longstreet's Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Trev Meed, circa 2013
4. Interior of Jack Longstreet's Cabin
Natural spring pool next to the cabin. image. Click for full size.
By Trev Meed, circa 2013
5. Natural spring pool next to the cabin.
This is a natural pool next to the cabin. Native and endangered pupfish live in these pools, and only exist here in these Ash Meadows pools.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Trev Meed of Round Mountain, Nevada. This page has been viewed 150 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Trev Meed of Round Mountain, Nevada. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A full view of the marker showing all text. • Wide area view of the marker and its surroundings. • Can you help?
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