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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Manassas in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Fight for Rickett’s Guns

 

—First Battle of Manassas —

 
The Fight for Rickett’s Guns Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 4, 2008
1. The Fight for Rickett’s Guns Marker
Inscription. Shells were exploding overhead as Ricketts’ men dueled Stonewall Jackson’s artillery, directly across the field. Sharpshooters’ bullets thumped into the wooden limber chests. On the rear slope horses were screaming, dying. Suddenly from the far woods came an eerie, blood-chilling cry—the rebel yell. Through dense smoke, Ricketts could see Confederate infantry starting across the field.

Up to that moment the Confederates appeared to be loosing the battle, and possibly the war. Here the momentum shifted. At Henry House and other stops on the tour, exhibits reveal how the battle rushed toward the unexpected climax at Ricketts’ guns.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 38° 48.829′ N, 77° 31.328′ W. Marker was near Manassas, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker could be reached from Sudley Road (Virginia Route 234) half a mile south of Lee Highway (Interstate 29), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. The marker is at a wayside on the Henry House Hill trail, which starts at the Manassas National Battlefield Park visitor center. Marker was in this post office area: Manassas VA 20109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Fight for Rickett’s Guns Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
2. The Fight for Rickett’s Guns Marker
At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Artillery Duel (here, next to this marker); 7th Georgia Markers (within shouting distance of this marker); Henry Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Lieutenant Ramsey (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Honoring the Dead (about 400 feet away but has been reported missing); a different marker also named Honoring the Dead (about 400 feet away); Invaded Farmland (about 400 feet away); Wade Hampton (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Invaded Farmland (about 400 feet away but has been reported missing); Thomas Jonathan Jackson (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. On the lower portion of the marker is a portrait of Captain James B. Ricketts, Company I, 1st U.S. Artillery, with the caption In the Confederate charge, Ricketts was badly wounded in the leg, captured, and taken to Confederate headquarters at the nearby Lewis plantation. Above the portrait to the right is a painting depicting the loss of Ricketts' Guns.

This marker was replaced by a new one named Artillery Duel (see nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .
Looking West, in the Direction the Cannon is Pointing image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
3. Looking West, in the Direction the Cannon is Pointing
Notice Stonewall Jackson on his horse in the distance on the right “There stands Jackson like a stone wall.”

1. General James B. Ricketts. This page has a portrait of New York native General Ricketts (scroll down to see it), who was Captain during the First Battle of Bull Run. (Submitted on March 18, 2007.) 

2. James Brewerton Ricketts, Major General, United States Army. (Submitted on March 18, 2007.)
 
Additional keywords. First Battle of Bull Run. 1st Bull Run. 1st Manassas. Ricketts’ cannon, Rickett's cannon, Ricketts' cannon, Union Captain J. B. Ricketts.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Atop Henry Hill Looking North image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
4. Atop Henry Hill Looking North
This marker in the foreground, Ricketts’ cannon and Henry House, with the 1865 Bull Run Monument to the right. A limber with its chest can be seen on the far left.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,009 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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