Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
National Park in Gloucester County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Red Bank

Red Bank Battlefield

 
 
The Battle of Red Bank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
1. The Battle of Red Bank Marker
Inscription.
Fire low men, they have a broad belt just above their hips – aim at that.”
Colonel Christopher Greene, October 22, 1777

On October 22, Colonel Carl von Donop advanced 1,200 Hessians on Fort Mercer. Dramatically outnumbered, American forces held the fort with 100 soldiers. They did, however, possess a distinct advantage. The previous day, a young American soldier named Jonas Cattell had overheard Hessian soldiers in Haddonfield discussing their plans to assault the fort. Cattell, a local hunter known for his knowledge of the South Jersey backwoods, ran ten miles to alert Greene’s men.

The Americans were extremely well prepared, despite their lack of men and inflicted heavy losses on the Hessians. It’s estimated that 400 Hessians, including von Donop, died during the battle. Most of the dead were buried on the Whitall property, including von Donop.
 
Erected 2015 by New Jersey Historical Commission.
 
Location. 39° 52.27′ N, 75° 11.371′ W. Marker is in National Park, New Jersey, in Gloucester County. Marker can be reached from Hessian Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is on the Red Bank Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: National Park NJ 08063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Battle of Red Bank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
2. The Battle of Red Bank Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Flag of Fort Mercer (a few steps from this marker); African American Soldiers (a few steps from this marker); Fort Mercer (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Fort Mercer (a few steps from this marker); Fort Mercer at Red Bank / Fort Mercer is Alerted (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonel Christopher Greene (within shouting distance of this marker); Brigadier General Hugh Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); The Soldiers (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in National Park.
 
More about this marker. The upper left of the marker contains a portrait of Colonel Christopher Greene by James Sullivan Lincoln, 1863. It has a caption of “Colonel Christopher Greene fought valiantly at Red Bank and later at the Battle of Rhode Island. Greene and several African American soldiers died on March 14, 1781 after being ambushed by a group of Loyalists perhaps angry that he had led African American troops against the crown.
Below this is a sketch of Jonas Carrell from ‘Memoirs of the Gloucester Fox Hunt Club’, with the caption “Cattell is remembered for his bravery in running the ten miles between Haddonfield and Red Bank to alert Colonel Greene of the Hessian advance.”
 
Also see . . .
The Battle of Red Bank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
3. The Battle of Red Bank Marker
 Red Bank Battlefield. Account of the action at Fort Mercer during the Revolutionary War. (Submitted on October 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
The Battle of Red Bank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
4. The Battle of Red Bank Marker
American soldiers are seen beyond the marker awaiting an attack by hessian troops.
The Battle of Red Bank image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
5. The Battle of Red Bank
Hessian soldiers attack the Americans at Fort Mercer.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 147 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement