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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sinclair in Carbon County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Rock Springs Massacre

 
 
Rock Springs Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 9, 2015
1. Rock Springs Massacre Marker
Photo Source: 26 September 1885 Harper's Weekly
Inscription. Anglo-European Coal Miners Near Rock Springs, Wyoming... killed 26 Chinese on Thursday afternoon, September 3, 1885, and torched their nearby settlement. More than 550 other Orientals fled into the hills. Two days later, Fort Fred Steele's Commander Lieutenant Colonel Henry L. Chipman, plus two officers and 49 enlisted men of the 7th Infantry's Companies B and E, were ordered west via train to quell the chaos and protect government property. They also helped establish Camp Pilot Butte near Rock Springs before returning to Fort Fred Steele in mid-November that same year.
 
Erected by Wyoming Recreation Commission.
 
Location. 41° 46.669′ N, 106° 56.765′ W. Marker is near Sinclair, Wyoming, in Carbon County. Marker is on County Route 347 near Interstate 80, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sinclair WY 82334, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Image of Fort Fred Steele (here, next to this marker); Major Thomas Tipton Thornburgh (here, next to this marker); Major General Philippe Regis de Trobriand (here, next to this marker); Major General Frederick Steele
Rock Springs Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 9, 2015
2. Rock Springs Massacre Marker
This marker is second from the right.
(here, next to this marker); Thornburgh's Command (here, next to this marker); Viewing the Fort Grounds (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Fred Steele after 1886 (within shouting distance of this marker); Enlisted Men's Barracks (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Sinclair.
 
More about this marker. This marker, among a grouping of a half-dozen other markers, is located at Fort Fred Steele State Park on County Road 347, north of the Interstate 80 Exit 228 and on the north side of the railroad tracks near where County Road 347 passes beneath the railroad bridge.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Rock Springs Massacre - Wyoming Historical Society. On the morning of Sept. 2, 1885, a fight broke out between white and Chinese miners in the No. 6 mine in Rock Springs. Whites fatally wounded a Chinese miner with blows of a pick to the skull. A second Chinese was badly beaten. Finally a foreman arrived and ended the violence. But instead of going back to work, the white miners went home and fetched guns, hatchets, knives and clubs. (Submitted on October 21, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.)
The Rock Springs Massacre image. Click for full size.
By Harper's Illustrated, circa 1885
3. The Rock Springs Massacre
 

2. Chinese and the Anti-Chinese Movement - Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest. Chinese immigrants worked primarily as laborers and lived largely in the states and territories of the American West. Most toiled at mining and constructing railroad lines across the region, and they also worked in agriculture. Some worked at providing services to other Chinese people, particularly those concentrated in Chinatown districts in western cities. (Submitted on October 21, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Additional keywords. Anti-Chinese Riot
 
Categories. Asian Americans
 
Federal Troops on South Front Street, Rock Springs, 1885 image. Click for full size.
National Archives, circa 1885
4. Federal Troops on South Front Street, Rock Springs, 1885
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 175 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   4. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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