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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ambush

 
 
Ambush Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
1. Ambush Marker
Inscription. On the morning of July 9, 1864, John T. Worthington sent his family to safety in the cellar. From an upstairs window he watched Confederate General McCausland lead his cavalry brigade of 1,400 men into an ambush. Concealed behind a fence and waist high corn, 1,400 Union troops awaited the dismounted cavalrymen. As the cavalrymen drew closer, the Union line opened fire. They decimated the Confederates, who quickly fell back. Later in the afternoon McCausland launched a second attack and took the Thomas House. The outflanked Union line fell back to the Georgetown Pike, launched a counterattack, and drove the Confederates once more back to Worthington Farm.

We remained under the terrific fire about one hour, in which time we lost one-third of the command killed and wounded.
Corporal Alexandria St. Clair, 16th Virginia Cavalry

(captions)
(upper center) Brigadier General James B. Ricketts commanded the Union defense at the Thomas Farm.
(middle right) Brigadier General John McCausland commanded the Confederate dismounted cavalry attacks.
(lower right) The Worthingtons purchased this farm and settled here with their family in 1862.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield—National Park Service—U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location.
Ambush Marker looking toward the parking area image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver
2. Ambush Marker looking toward the parking area
39° 21.701′ N, 77° 24.099′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from Baker Valley Road 0.6 miles south of Araby Church Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. This Marker is located on the grounds of the Worthington House & Farm, Stop 3 on the Auto-Tour route. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Through a Child's Eyes (here, next to this marker); McCausland’s Attack (within shouting distance of this marker); Worthington House (within shouting distance of this marker); Worthington-McKinney Ford (within shouting distance of this marker); Gordon’s Decisive Attack (approx. 0.6 miles away but has been reported missing); L'Hermitage (approx. 0.6 miles away); Caught in the Crossfire (approx. 0.6 miles away); Thick of the Battle (approx. 0.6 miles away but has been reported missing). Click for a list of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced an older marker at this location titled, "McCausland's Attack" (see nearby markers)
 
Also see . . .  Monocacy National Battlefield. National Park Service (Submitted on April 5, 2015.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Worthington Farmhouse image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
3. Worthington Farmhouse
Like many historic structures at Monocacy National Battlefield, the Worthington House has not had it's interior restored and is an outdoor exhibit only.
Confederate artillery image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
4. Confederate artillery
This cannon was part of a four-gun battery used by the Confederates during the battle of Monocacy. Out of those four guns, it is the only one remaining.
Nearby Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
5. Nearby Trail Marker
View atop Brooks Hill image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
6. View atop Brooks Hill
This overlook can be accessed by hiking the 1.9-mile Brooks Hill trail, one of two trails located at the Worthington Farm.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 240 times since then and 37 times this year. Last updated on , by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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