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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Civilians Under Siege

Monocacy National Battlefield

 
 
Civilians Under Siege Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
1. Civilians Under Siege Marker
Inscription. On the morning of July 9, 1864, C. Keefer Thomas hosted two Union officers at his breakfast table, talking about the impeding battle. Later that morning as the battle drew near, the Thomas family, with several houseguests, neighbors, enslaved laborers, and dogs, entered the farmhouse cellar.Here they experienced "hours of suspense, anxiety, and at times, terror," as one guest later recalled. Caught in a tug-of-war, the house was bombarded by artillery and minie balls, suffering significant damage. As the Union troops retreated, the cellar occupants emerged to find the farm in shambles with hundreds of dead and wounded soldiers scattered about the farm.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield.
 
Location. 39° 21.425′ N, 77° 23.444′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Baker Valley Road 0.3 miles south of Araby Church Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4486 Baker Valley Road, Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Final Attack (here, next to this marker); Federal Retreat (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Farm
Civilians Under Siege Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
2. Civilians Under Siege Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Thick of the Battle (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); Gordonís Decisive Attack (approx. ľ mile away but has been reported missing); Final Stand (approx. 0.3 miles away); Clustered Spires of Frederick (approx. half a mile away); History of the Monocacy River Valley (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced an older marker at this location titled, "Thomas Farm" (see nearby markers)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Major Peter Vandenburgh image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
3. Major Peter Vandenburgh
I rushed into the house...and found them in the cellar frightened to death. - Major Peter Vrendenburgh, 14th New Jersey Regiment, had befriended the Thomas family two years earlier when his regiment guarded the junction.
Close-up of photo on marker
Thomas House, 1893. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
4. Thomas House, 1893.
Close-up shows battle damage in front porch column.
Close-up of photo on marker
Thomas House, 1893 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
5. Thomas House, 1893
with 10th Vermont veteran Captain George E. Davis at left.
Close-up of photo on marker
Neighbors image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
6. Neighbors
Cornelius, Richard, and Antoinette Gambrill (circled at left in this 1880's photograph) took refuge with the Thomases in the cellar during the battle.
Close-up of photo on map
Araby - The Thomas Farm image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
7. Araby - The Thomas Farm
C. Keefer Thomas purchased "Araby" in 1860 to escape the dangers of the war in Baltimore. Little did he know that four years later the severest fighting of the Battle of Monocacy would take place on his farm.
Close-up of image on nearby "Bold Plan" marker
Trail Map<br>You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
8. Trail Map
You Are Here
Close-up of map on nearby trail marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 418 times since then and 5 times this year. Last updated on , by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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