Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Evanston in Uinta County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Native Americans

 
 
Native Americans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 10, 2015
1. Native Americans Marker
Captions: (left) Tipi liner helped to insulate the dwelling; (center) Beaded buckskin tobacco pouch; (top right) Chief Washakie; (bottom right) Shoshone Chief Washakie and Chiefs.
Inscription. Both Shoshone and Arapahoe Indians camped in this area from the early 1800s until the Fort Bridger Treaty Council of 1868 established the Wind River Reservation.
They traded beadwork and pelts to the early pioneers for other goods. Chief Washakie was the major influence in keeping peace and safety for pioneers and their settlements. Chief Washakie died in 1900, respected by all who knew him.
 
Erected by Timeless Tracks, Incorporated; City of Evanston, Wyoming; United States Forest Service; United States Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, National Scenic Byways Program; State of Wyoming, Department of Transportation; Interpretive Graphics; At Home Services.
 
Location. 41° 9.473′ N, 110° 51.053′ W. Marker is near Evanston, Wyoming, in Uinta County. Marker is on Wyoming Route 150 Frontage Road near Route 75, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9998 Wyoming Highway 150, Evanston WY 82930, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Meyers Crossing (here, next to this marker); Transcontinental Railroad (a few steps from this marker); Historic Trails
Native Americans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 10, 2015
2. Native Americans Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Aspen Tunnel (a few steps from this marker); Bear River City (a few steps from this marker); Mormon Trail (approx. 1.1 miles away); Hilliard City and Piedmont (approx. 1.3 miles away); Hilliard, Wyoming (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Evanston.
 
Also see . . .  Chief Washakie: Great Leader of the Shoshone People. At about this time, wagon trains began to rumble through Shoshone country. White man was moving rapidly into the West, and there was no turning back. The Shoshone chief and his council had a big decision to make: Would they fight for their lives against the take-over, or would they choose a different road and make peace with their new neighbors? The Shoshones did a bit of both. With Washakie in the lead, the tribe attacked every stage station along the Oregon Trail in 1862, from what is now Casper all the way to the Utah border. (Submitted on October 31, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
Chief Washakie (center) image. Click for full size.
3. Chief Washakie (center)
Note that this is the same photograph as on the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 131 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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