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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maumee in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Why Fight Here?

 
 
Why Fight Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
1. Why Fight Here? Marker
Close-up view of the marker.
Inscription. The Maumee River Valley nurtured a hunter-gatherer life and later farming communities for thousands of Native Americans. The valley also attracted the French, British and American settlers because of navigable waterways and the fur trade.

Clashes in land use and ownership, living patterns and systems of government stimulated multiple conflicts leading to the Battle of Fallen Timbers.

One of the earliest and most important industries in the United States and Canada was the fur trade. Beginning in the 1500s, Europeans and Natives would trade furs for items such as tools and weapons. One of the most sought after furs was beaver, used in European fashion for hats. The picture above is a re-enactment of a French fur trader and native hunting in a canoe.
 
Erected by Metroparks of the Toledo Area.
 
Location. 41° 33.006′ N, 83° 41.851′ W. Marker is in Maumee, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker can be reached from North Jerome Road south of Monclova Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. This marker is the first in a series of markers seen along the Fallen Timbers Battlefield, walking trail. It is a short distance beyond the park's visitor center and parking area, and situated in
Why Fight Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
2. Why Fight Here? Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing woodland Native Americans, camped along the banks of a river, much like the Maumee River.
a clearing just before the visitor enters the woods. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4949 North Jerome Road , Maumee OH 43537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Partners in Preservation (within shouting distance of this marker); Unfair Negotiations (within shouting distance of this marker); Early American Defeats (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battle of Fallen Timbers (about 400 feet away); Fighting Forces (about 500 feet away); A Long March (about 700 feet away); Cover and Camouflage (approx. 0.2 miles away); Caught Off Guard (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Maumee.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNative AmericansWars, US IndianWaterways & Vessels
 
Why Fight Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
3. Why Fight Here? Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing woodland Native Americans, camping in a manner that displays several European influences.
Why Fight Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
4. Why Fight Here? Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a photograph, showing a re-enactment of a French fur trader and native hunting in a canoe.
Why Fight Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
5. Why Fight Here? Marker
A distant view of the marker along the park's walking trail, in a clearing, just before the trail enters into the deep woods.
Why Fight Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
6. Why Fight Here? Marker
View of the marker along the park's walking trail, in a clearing, just before the trail enters into the deep woods.
Why Fight Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
7. Why Fight Here? Marker
View of the marker.
Why Fight Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
8. Why Fight Here? Marker
View of the marker, situated along the side of the trail, looking back towards the visitor center.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 142 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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