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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington in Lafayette County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Mount Vernon Foundation Stones

 
 
Mount Vernon Foundation Stones Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 28, 2015
1. Mount Vernon Foundation Stones Marker
Inscription. From 1820 to 1822 the now vanished village of Mount Vernon, about seven miles east of Lexington at the mouth of Tabo Creek, was the county seat of Lillard (now Lafayette) County. These stones were probably quarried from the nearby bluff and used as foundation stones in Mount Vernon. In 1927 they were reused for the nearby Ennis Darnell house which later burned.
 
Erected 2003.
 
Location. 39° 11.1′ N, 93° 52.785′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Missouri, in Lafayette County. Marker is on 13th Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. This marker is located at the base of "The Library Building" marker in Lexington, Mo. Marker is in this post office area: Lexington MO 64067, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Library Building (here, next to this marker); Christ Church (within shouting distance of this marker); The Steamboat Saluda Disaster (within shouting distance of this marker); William Morrison (within shouting distance of this marker); Lexington (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lafayette County Courthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); Replica of the Statue of Liberty (approx. 0.2 miles away); Original Site of Russell, Majors and Waddell Home Office (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Lexington.
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 102 times since then and 16 times this year. Photo   1. submitted on , by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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