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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pound in Wise County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Pound Gap

 
 
Pound Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
1. Pound Gap Marker
Inscription. Pound Gap probably was named for nearby grain pounding mill. Christopher Gist, returning from the Ohio River where he surveyed land for the Ohio Company, crossed the gap in 1751. During the Civil War, Pound Gap gained strategic importance as a gateway between Virginia and Kentucky. Union Col. James A. Garfield (later president) and his brigade forced the gap from the Kentucky side on 16 March 1862 after a skirmish with Confederate forces under Brig. Gen. Humphrey Marshall. Confederate Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan forced it from the Virginia side, capturing and destroying property in Kentucky.
 
Erected 1999 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number XB-7.)
 
Location. 37° 9.289′ N, 82° 37.838′ W. Marker is near Pound, Virginia, in Wise County. Marker is on Orby Cantrell Highway (U.S. 23), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. It is just inside the state line at the gas station. Marker is in this post office area: Pound VA 24279, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wise County / Kentucky (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Caudillís Army (approx. 0.2 miles away in Kentucky); Brothers Once More
Pound Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
2. Pound Gap Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away in Kentucky); Pound Gap Massacre (approx. 0.2 miles away in Kentucky); Pound Gap Engagement (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Pound Gap (approx. 0.4 miles away in Kentucky); The Crooked Road (approx. 0.4 miles away); Daniel Webster Dotson (approx. 0.4 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker replaces one erected between 1937 and 1941 with the same title and number which read, “Christopher Gist, returning from the Ohio River, crossed this gap in 1751. James A. Garfield (afterwards President) with Union troops forced this gap in March, 1862. In June, 1864, John H. Morgan, on his Kentucky raid, forced it from the Virginia side, capturing and destroying much property.”

That marker replaced an earlier one with the same title and number from the late 1920s that read “Christopher Gist, returning from his Ohio explorations, crossed this gap in the spring of 1751. Moving southward, he camped at Gistís station now Coeburn.”
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 201 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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