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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Greenville Woman's College

 
 
Greenville Woman's College Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 12, 2008
1. Greenville Woman's College Marker
Inscription.
Established in 1854 by the S.C. Baptist Convention, this institution opened as Greenville Baptist Female College in February 1856, on this site originally donated by Vardry McBee to the Greenville Academies. Its name was changed to Greenville Woman's College in 1914. It was coordinated with Furman University in 1933, merged with Furman in 1938, and moved in 1961 to the consolidated campus six miles north of town.
 
Erected 1975 by Furman University. (Marker Number 23-15.)
 
Location. 34° 51.33′ N, 82° 24.079′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is on College street west of North academy Street (U.S. 123). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Greenville SC 29601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Soldier's Rest (within shouting distance of this marker); The Buncombe Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); Textile Hall (approx. ¼ mile away); SC Ordinance of Secession (approx. ¼ mile away); Confederate Armory (approx. ¼ mile away); In Memory of 81st Wildcat Division / Camp Sevier
Greenville Woman's College Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mitchell Gambrell, August 12, 2008
2. Greenville Woman's College Marker
(approx. ¼ mile away); Max Heller Legacy Plaza (approx. ¼ mile away); St Mary's Catholic Church (approx. ¼ mile away); General Robert E. Lee (approx. ¼ mile away); Kershaw Brigade (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Greenville.
 
More about this marker. The site is the current home of Heritage Green, a collection of buildings that house the Greenville Little Theatre, the Art Museum, the Upstate History Museum, and the Children's Museum. The property was donated to the city of Greenville by Vardry McBee with the understanding that it would always be used for educational and artistic purposes.
 
Regarding Greenville Woman's College. Greenville Woman's College, underfunded and unable to withstand the financial turmoil of the Great Depression, was forced to merge with Furman after seventy-six years as an independent women's college. The school, however, maintained a separate campus until 1961, when Furman moved to its present site.
 
Also see . . .
1. Greenville Woman's College. Established in 1854 by the South Carolina
Greenville Woman's College Marker -<br>Children's Museum of the Upstate in Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
3. Greenville Woman's College Marker -
Children's Museum of the Upstate in Background
Baptist Convention, this institution opened as Greenville Baptist Female College in February 1856. (Submitted on March 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Furman University. Furman University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university in Greenville, South Carolina, United States. (Submitted on March 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Judson Hall. Marker dedicated to Judson Hall, former home to Greenville Woman's College. (Submitted on May 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Heritage Green, Greenville. Nestled in the heart of downtown Greenville, South Carolina, Heritage Green is urban arts and cultural campus that comprises four museums—The Greenville County Museum of Art, the Museum & Gallery at Heritage Green, the Upcountry History Museum and The Children's Museum. (Submitted on April 2, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. The Children's Museum of the Upstate. Official website of the Children's Museum of the Upstate. (Submitted on April 2, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Greenville County Museum of Art. The Greenville County Museum of Art introduces four new exhibitions, each offering unique views that provide something for virtually every taste. (Submitted on April 2, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Greenville Woman's College Marker -<br>Greenville Little Theatre in Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
4. Greenville Woman's College Marker -
Greenville Little Theatre in Background
 

7. Greenville Little Theatre. Official website of the Greenville Little Theatre. (Submitted on April 2, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. Greenville County Library System. Official website of the Greenville County Library System. (Submitted on April 2, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Upcountry History Museum. Official website of the Upcountry History Museum. (Submitted on April 2, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. Museum & Gallery at Heritage Green. The Museum & Gallery became an integral part of Heritage Green in April of 2008. (Submitted on April 2, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About Vardry McBee
Vardry McBee was perhaps the most pivotal figure in the history of our city and Greenville County as a whole, thanks to his business acumen and impressive foresight for how the community could grow and prosper.

A product of the Carolina frontier, McBee was born in 1775 on the eve of the American Revolution, a conflict that would prove formative in his early years. Both his father and older brother fought with the Patriots, at King’s Mountain and the Battle of Cowpens. McBee
Vardry McBee<br>(1776-1854) image. Click for full size.
Coxe Collection, Greenville County Historical Society
5. Vardry McBee
(1776-1854)
himself never fought for American independence, but instead used his considerable fortune to improve the lives of his fellow citizens, appropriating his land and fortunes to public improvement projects.

McBee opened the first textile mill on the Reedy River, but he saw value in a diversified economy. In his private business life, that meant he owned two flour mills, a cotton factory, and wool and paper mills. Publicly, even as he approached his 80s, it led him to champion the construction of a railroad line that connected Columbia and Greenville. In 1853, this line became the first rail to serve the community, and it would become a turning point in the economy of the town. (Source: G: The Magazine of Greenville, Jan/Feb 09, pg 66.)
    — Submitted March 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Vardry McBee: History in Brief
At a glance An industrialist and philanthropist, McBee worked to diversify the Southern economy while also promoting education and religion. He donated land for the city’s first four churches (four different denominations), as well as the male and female academies. Those efforts influenced Furman University’s move to Greenville (from just north of Columbia) and the development of Greenville Women’s College.

Claim
Greenville Baptist Female College image. Click for full size.
Special Collections, South Carolina Library, USC Columbia
6. Greenville Baptist Female College
to fame
In 1816, McBee bought the town of Greenville from landowner Lemuel Alston—all 11,028 acres of it.

Did You know? McBee was living in Lincolnton, North Carolina, when he purchased Greenville. Although he wouldn’t move to Greenville until 1836, McBee promoted Greenville as a summer resort and industrial center.

He said it “A man should be prudent and careful, (not a) bully of virtue, nor a bigot.” (Source: G: The Magazine of Greenville, Jan/Feb 09, pg 66.)
    — Submitted September 26, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Education
 
Greenville Woman's College -<br>Main Campus Building image. Click for full size.
William B. Coxe Collection, Greenville County Historical Society
7. Greenville Woman's College -
Main Campus Building
Greenville Woman's College -<br>Ramsey Fine Arts Building<br>Site of the Greenville Little Theater image. Click for full size.
William B. Coxe Collection, Greenville County Historical Society, circa 1922
8. Greenville Woman's College -
Ramsey Fine Arts Building
Site of the Greenville Little Theater
Greenville Woman's College -<br>College Library image. Click for full size.
William B. Coxe Collection, Greenville County Historical Society
9. Greenville Woman's College -
College Library
Heritage Green Center for Human Enrichment image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
10. Heritage Green Center for Human Enrichment
Heritage Green<br>Center for Human Enrichment image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
11. Heritage Green
Center for Human Enrichment
Project of the Greenville County Foundation
1969
Holly & Arthur Magill image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
12. Holly & Arthur Magill
If you
seek their
monument,
look about
you.
Children's Museum of the Upstate image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
13. Children's Museum of the Upstate
Children's Museum of the Upstate<br>300 College Street image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
14. Children's Museum of the Upstate
300 College Street
Greenville County Museum of Art<br>420 College Street image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
15. Greenville County Museum of Art
420 College Street
Greenville Little Theatre<br>444 College Street image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
16. Greenville Little Theatre
444 College Street
Hughes Branch<br>Greenville County Library System image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
17. Hughes Branch
Greenville County Library System
Hughes Library<br>25 Heritage Green Place image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
18. Hughes Library
25 Heritage Green Place
Hughes Library - Side Wing image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
19. Hughes Library - Side Wing
Upcountry History Museum<br>540 Buncombe Street image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
20. Upcountry History Museum
540 Buncombe Street
Museum and Gallery at Heritage Green<br>25 Heritage Green Place image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
21. Museum and Gallery at Heritage Green
25 Heritage Green Place
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,120 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by M. L. 'Mitch' Gambrell of Taylors, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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