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Pound Gap in Letcher County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Brothers Once More

United We Stand, Divided We Fall

 
 
Brothers Once More Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
1. Brothers Once More Monument
Inscription. Dedicated to all Letcher Countians that suffered on the battlefield and homefront during the War Between the States.

President Abraham Lincoln. Born in Hodgenville, Kentucky, 1809–1865.

President Jefferson Davis. Born in Fairview, Kentucky, 1808–1889

Union Regiments: 14th Kentucky Infantry • 14th Kentucky Cavalry • 47th Kentucky Infantry • Three Forks Battalion • 39th Kentucky Mounted Rifles

Confederate Regiments: 5th Kentucky Infantry • 7th Confederate Cavalry • 10th Kentucky Cavalry • 10th Kentucky Mounted Rifles • 13th Kentucky Cavalry • 21st Virginia Infantry • 64th Virginia Cavalry • 50th Virginia Infantry
 
Location. 37° 9.329′ N, 82° 38.007′ W. Marker is in Pound Gap, Kentucky, in Letcher County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 23, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. It is just inside the Kentucky state line, at the Civil War Memorial. Parking is available at the memorial. Marker is in this post office area: Jenkins KY 41537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Caudill’s Army (a few steps from this marker); Pound Gap Massacre (a few steps from this marker); Wise County / Kentucky
Brothers Once More Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
2. Brothers Once More Monument
(about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line in Virginia); Pound Gap (approx. 0.2 miles away in Virginia); a different marker also named Pound Gap (approx. ¼ mile away); Pound Gap Engagement (approx. half a mile away in Virginia); The Crooked Road (approx. 0.6 miles away in Virginia); Daniel Webster Dotson (approx. 0.6 miles away in Virginia). Click for a list of all markers in Pound Gap.
 
Additional comments.
1. I Asked God
(Note found on a dead confederate soldier)

I asked God for strength, that I might achieve.
I was made weak, that I might learn humbly to obey.
I asked for health, that I might do great things.
I was giving infirmity, that I might do better things.
I asked for riches, that I might be happy.
I was given poverty, that I might be wise.
I asked for power, that I might have the praise of men.
I was given weakness, that I might feel the need of God.
I asked for all things, that I might enjoy life.
I was given life, that I might enjoy all things.
I got nothing I asked for - - - but everything
Four Double-Pane, Double-Sided Granite Panels image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
3. Four Double-Pane, Double-Sided Granite Panels
These panels are inscribed with names of Letcher County soldiers. They are to the left of the walkway to the monument. Their faces are shown on the following photographs.
I had hoped for.
Almost despite myself, my unspoken prayers were answered.
I am, among all people, most blessed.

Transcribed from Photograph No. 9 below.
This anonymous poem is alleged to have been found on a CSA casualty at the Devil’s Den, Gettysburg.
    — Submitted November 21, 2015.

2. Letcher County and the War Between the States, 1861 to 1865.
(posted in the Information Kiosk at the Brothers Once More Memorial.)

When the War Between the States began in April of 1861, the citizens of Letcher County were deeply divided when it became apparent each would have to take sides, Union or Confederate. Most neighborhoods and families would send soldiers to both armies, making it truly a “Brother Against Brother” war.

Though the local men where not professional soldiers, the hardships and dangers of living in the mountains had trained them to be hardy and courageous fighters. These traits would serve both armies well during the war.

Whitesburg was the county seat and was an official Confederate recruiting center. The nearest Union recruitment centers were Manchester and Louisa. Both armies use the town and surrounding bottoms as campgrounds and training fields. The small town was also used as a hospital for
First Pair, West Face image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
4. First Pair, West Face
sick and wounded troops, many dying and being buried here.

The road going through Pound Gap into Virginia was considered the best access into that state. The gap was occupied by troops from both armies throughout the war. This resulted in several battles for the gap, the largest on March 16, 1862 when General James Garfield and his Union troops defeated Confederate troops guarding the important passageway. On June 2, 1864, General John Hunt Morgan and his rebel cavalry routed a large contingent of Union defenders in the gap on his last raid into Kentucky.

Constant skirmishes and fights between the two armies occurred in Letcher County throughout the war, never large in number but deadly just the same. Both armies patrolled the mountainous area in an attempt to protect the inhabitants from bushwhackers; gangs of soldiers with no allegiance to either side. The constant fighting resulted in hundreds of deaths, many resulting in hard feelings that continued years after the end of the war. The majority of mountain feuds can trace their beginnings back to this turbulent time.

The following statement on the Confederate Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery holds true for all Letcher Countians of the War, regardless of Confederate or Union: “Not for fame or reward, not for place or rank, not lured by ambition or goaded by necessity, but in simple obedience
Second Pair, West Face image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
5. Second Pair, West Face
to duty as they understood it. These men suffered all, sacrificed all, dared all and died.”
    — Submitted November 21, 2015.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Third Pair, West Face image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
6. Third Pair, West Face
Fourth Pair, West Face image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
7. Fourth Pair, West Face
Fourth Pair, East Face image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
8. Fourth Pair, East Face
Third Pair, East Face image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
9. Third Pair, East Face
The East faces of the first and second pair can be found on the separate marker page for Caudill’s Army.
Informational Gazebo image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
10. Informational Gazebo
A number of panels inside show photographs, there is a guest book and pamphlets for the taking in this gazebo. One of the panels has a short history, reproduced on Photograph No. 11, and transcribed earlier on this page.
Letcher County and the War Between the States, 1861 to 1865 image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
11. Letcher County and the War Between the States, 1861 to 1865
The text on this panel has been transcribed above.
Detail from the Brothers Once More Memorial image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 17, 2015
12. Detail from the Brothers Once More Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 251 times since then and 48 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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