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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Moran in Teton County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

John Colter

 
 
John Colter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 12, 2015
1. John Colter Marker
Inscription.
This bay is named for
John Colter
discoverer of the Teton mountains and scenic wonders of the upper Yellowstone. Experienced as a hunter for the 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition, he explored this region in Winter of 1807-1808 in the employ of fur trader Manuel Lisa.

Dedicated on the anniversary of Colter's historic passage.
1957

 
Erected 1957 by Department of the Interior National Park Service and Wyoming Historical Society.
 
Location. 43° 54.138′ N, 110° 38.604′ W. Marker is near Moran, Wyoming, in Teton County. Marker can be reached from Colter Bay Village Road near Colter Bay Marina Road when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moran WY 83013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Art of Making Mountains (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Changing Landscape (about 300 feet away); The Bold Trappers (approx. 1.9 miles away); Stephen Leek's Camera Conservation (approx. 1.9 miles away); Grand Teton National Park (approx.
John Colter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 12, 2015
2. John Colter Marker
Grand Teton is in the distance.
3.7 miles away); A New Era (approx. 3.7 miles away); Jackson Lake Lodge (approx. 3.7 miles away); Young, Restless, and Still Rising (approx. 4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Moran.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located on the pathway leading to the Colter Bay Village Marina in Grand Teton National Park.
 
Also see . . .  John Colter - Discovering Lewis and Clark. Eventually one of the Corps of Discovery's most famous veterans, John Colter joined the expedition early, became one of its most useful hands, left it early, and yet did not get home until nearly four years after it ended. His permanent role as an icon of Western American history came from his adventures as a fur trapper between the summer of 1806 and the spring of 1810. (Submitted on November 26, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Exploration
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 119 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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