Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Corbett in Multnomah County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Welcome to Multnomah Falls

Our Nation’s Second Highest Year-Round Waterfall

 

—Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area —

 
Welcome to Multnomah Falls Marker image. Click for full size.
By Phyllis Prats, May 30, 2015
1. Welcome to Multnomah Falls Marker
Inscription. Visited by over two million people a year, Multnomah Falls is the second-highest year-round waterfall in the United States and one of 77 on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge. Multnomah Creek, created by underground springs from Larch Mountain, feeds the falls as it plunges off steep basalt cliffs The water flow varies, but is most spectacular in the winter and spring when at its fullest the falls plummet 543 feet to the upper plunge pool, descend another 69 feet, plus an additional 8 feet in between to total a 620-foot-fall! As our nation's western cities boomed in the late 1880s, people looked for ways to escape the bustle and overcrowding. Portland residents—and eventually visitors from all over the country—traveled to the Columbia River Gorge for its scenic beauty and towering waterfalls. Regularly scheduled trains and steamships filled with tourists navigated up and down the Gorge, and Multnomah Falls soon became a favorite attraction.

(captions)
The concrete bridge spans Multnomah Creek between the upper and lower cataracts of Multnomah Falls. The original bridge (shown) was built in the early 1880s out of log poles. After its collapse, the current bridge was built in 1914 and named for Simon Benson, a strong advocate for the Historic Columbia River Gorge Highway and Multnomah Falls.

Multnomah
Multnomah Falls image. Click for full size.
By Phyllis Prats, May 30, 2015
2. Multnomah Falls
Falls Lodge, designed by noted Portland architect Albert E. Doyle, was built in 1925 by the city of Portland to capitalize on the booming tourist trade of the Columbia River Gorge. Today, the Lodge has a snack bar, gift shop, full-service restaurant, and a U.S. Forest Service interpretive center. It was placed on the National Register for Historic Places in 1981.
 
Location. 45° 34.656′ N, 122° 7.026′ W. Marker is near Corbett, Oregon, in Multnomah County. Marker is on Historic Columbia River Highway 3.3 miles east of Bridal Veil. Click for map. It is at the Multnomah Falls Lodge. Marker is at or near this postal address: 53000 Historic Columbia River Hwy, Corbett OR 97019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Simon Benson (here, next to this marker); Discover Wahkeena Falls (approx. half a mile away); Beacon Rock (approx. 5.9 miles away in Washington); Samuel C. Lancaster (approx. 6.7 miles away); Marshall N. Dana (approx. 6.7 miles away); Vista House (approx. 6.7 miles away); Broughton’s Expedition (approx. 8 miles away); a different marker also named Beacon Rock (approx. 8.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Corbett.
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
Multnomah Falls image. Click for full size.
By Phyllis Prats, May 30, 2015
3. Multnomah Falls
<i>Multnomah Falls, Columbia River. On Line O.W.R. & N. Co.</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1910
4. Multnomah Falls, Columbia River. On Line O.W.R. & N. Co.
Note the absence of the Benson Bridge (compare with Photos 2 and 3).
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 150 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4. submitted on . This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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