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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Ralston in Park County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Daniel K. Inouye

 
 
Daniel K. Inouye Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2015
1. Daniel K. Inouye Marker
Inscription. U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye (1924-2012) was a lifelong public servant. A veteran who nearly lost his life in brave service with the highly-decorated, all-Japanese American 442nd Regimental Combat Team in World War II, has been recognized for his military valor with several medals and citations, including the Medal of Honor.
Senator Inouye was the first Japanese American to serve in Congress, with posts in both the Hawai'i House of Representatives and the (U.S.) Senate, where he rose to the rank of president pro tempore. He was instrumental in advancing the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which provided redress for Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II. For his leadership, he was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013.
Senator Inouye was also a strong supporter of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation and gave the keynote address at the grand opening of the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center. "The work is just starting," he said. "This Center will play an important role in reminding people that interment did happen in this great nation. And it we don't watch ourselves it could happen again." He will always be remembered as a great American patriot and friend.
 
Erected by Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation.
 
Location.
Daniel K. Inouye Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 14, 2015
2. Daniel K. Inouye Marker
The marker is on the right.
44° 40.223′ N, 108° 56.977′ W. Marker is near Ralston, Wyoming, in Park County. Marker can be reached from Road 19 near Lane 15, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1474 Road 19, Ralston WY 82440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Norman Y. Mineta (here, next to this marker); Heart Mountain Relocation Center Honor Roll and Flag Pole (a few steps from this marker); Heart Mountain World War II Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Heart Mountain Relocation Center Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Heart Mountain, Wyoming - Fall 1943 (within shouting distance of this marker); Barracks Living Area: (within shouting distance of this marker); Relocation Center Support Facilities (within shouting distance of this marker); Heart Mountain High School: (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Ralston.
 
More about this marker. Heart Mountain Relocation Center Memorial Park is located about 6 miles south of Ralston.
 
Also see . . .  Daniel Inouye - Wikipedia. On April 21, 1945, Inouye was grievously wounded while leading an assault on a heavily-defended ridge near San Terenzo in Tuscany, Italy, called the Colle Musatello.
Lt. Daniel K. Inouye image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
3. Lt. Daniel K. Inouye
The ridge served as a strongpoint of the German fortifications known as the Gothic Line, the last and most unyielding line of German defensive works in Italy. As he led his platoon in a flanking maneuver, three German machine guns opened fire from covered positions 40 yards away, pinning his men to the ground. Inouye stood up to attack and was shot in the stomach. Ignoring his wound, he proceeded to attack and destroy the first machine gun nest with hand grenades and his Thompson submachine gun. When informed of the severity of his wound, he refused treatment and rallied his men for an attack on the second machine gun position, which he successfully destroyed before collapsing from blood loss.
(Submitted on November 30, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. HeroesNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 133 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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