Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Rosharon in Brazoria County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Albert Sidney Johnston

(February 2, 1803 - April 6, 1862)

 
 
Albert Sidney Johnston Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, December 30, 2015
1. Albert Sidney Johnston Marker
Inscription. Kentucky native Albert Sidney Johnston graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1826. He was assigned to posts in New York and Missouri, and served in the Black Hawk War in 1832. He resigned his commission in 1834 to return to Kentucky to care for his dying wife.

Johnston came to Texas in July 1836 and enlisted in the Republic army. A month later he was appointed adjutant general, and in January 1837 became senior brigadier general in command of the army. He was appointed secretary of war by President Mirabeau B. Lamar in December 1838.

In 1840 Johnston returned to Kentucky, where he married Eliza Griffin in 1843. They settled at China Grove, Johnston's large plantation at this site, and continued to live here until 1849.

During the Mexican war Johnston commanded a company of Texas volunteers. Later, as a colonel in the U. S. Army, he served on the Texas frontier and in the West. At the outbreak of the Civil War he resigned and was appointed a Confederate general by President Jefferson Davis. Johnston was killed at the Battle of Shiloh in 1862 and was buried in New Orleans. In 1867 he was reinterred in the State Cemetery in Austin.
 
Erected 1989 by Texas Historical Commision. (Marker Number 9568.)
 
Location.
Granite Marker by Organizations Honoring General Johnston image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, December 30, 2015
2. Granite Marker by Organizations Honoring General Johnston
29° 18.81′ N, 95° 27.019′ W. Marker is near Rosharon, Texas, in Brazoria County. Marker is on Farm to Market Road 521 0.2 miles south of Cannon Road (Farm to Market Road 51), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Near an arched entrance marked China Grove. The entrance to what was once Albert Johnston's plantation. Marker is in this post office area: Rosharon TX 77583, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Vicinity of Oyster Creek and Chocolate Bayou (approx. 10 miles away); "Brit" Bailey Plantation (approx. 12.4 miles away); Munson Cemetery (approx. 12.4 miles away); James Briton "Brit" Bailey (approx. 12.4 miles away); Site of Carry Nation's Hotel (approx. 15.5 miles away); Bell's Landing (approx. 15.5 miles away); The Ammon Underwood House (approx. 15.6 miles away); Sweeny-Waddy Log Cabin (approx. 15.7 miles away).
 
Regarding Albert Sidney Johnston. General Johnson was the third most important general of the Confederacy but was considered by many of his contemporaries to be the finest soldier on either side of the war. Johnstonís death was seen as a major blow to the Confederacy. He was killed leading a charge during the Battle of Shiloh, the bloodiest engagement of the war to that point. By the end of the war in 1865,
Albert Sidney Johnston Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, December 30, 2015
3. Albert Sidney Johnston Marker
he remained the highest-ranking officer on either side to have been killed in action and remains the highest-ranking American military officer ever to be killed in action.
 
Also see . . .
1. Encyclopedia Britannica on General Johnson. (Submitted on December 31, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. The History Channel page on General Johnson. (Submitted on December 31, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
3. General Johnson in The Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on December 31, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
4. Impressive Monument to Johnson at the Shiloh Battlefield. (Submitted on December 31, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
5. Wikipedia on General Johnson (may be the most detailed article). (Submitted on December 31, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
6. Civil Way Page on Johnson. I think I could continue adding links all morning. He may be the most significant general in the War Between the States after Grant and Lee. Not for what he did in that war but for what he'd done and the esteem in which he was held by other generals. (Submitted on December 31, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 
 
Categories. War, Mexican-AmericanWar, Texas IndependenceWar, US CivilWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 209 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement