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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clarksville in Montgomery County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Fort Defiance Interpretive Center

City of Clarksville, Tennessee

 
 
Fort Defiance Interpretive Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 31, 2015
1. Fort Defiance Interpretive Center Marker
Inscription. The history of Clarksville unfolded on this site. Recipients of land grants from the American Revolution built settlements along the Cumberland and Red Rivers and with them, came early trade. As the Civil War moved closer, Clarksville, with its 5,000 inhabitants, was considered a prize for the Union forces, because of its large tobacco warehouses, prosperous businesses and educational institutions, its steamboat landings and railroad crossing. The Clarksville iron works and other foundries were capable of producing small arms, cannons and shells. With the fall of Fort Donelson in nearby Dover to the Union in February 1862, Clarksville and the Confederate river defense at Fort Defiance was considered critical to stopping federal forces from reaching Nashville. But as Union ships steamed toward Clarksville, city fathers determined the wiser course would be to surrender. Thus, the fort was taken without a shot, and the city fell under lengthy Union occupation. Union troops aided by local blacks who sought federal protection, reinforced the fort and renamed it Fort Bruce after Col. Sanders Bruce, the Union commander. Efforts to show the significance of this history began in 1982, in preparation for Clarksville's 1984 Bicentenary. Judge and Mrs. Sam E. Boaz who owned the fort property, deeded it to the city. Faculty and students
Fort Defiance Interpretive Center and marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 31, 2015
2. Fort Defiance Interpretive Center and marker.
from Austin Peay State University cleared the site, and Mayor Ted Crozier arranged for its maintenance as a city park. In 2002, Mayor John Piper established the Fort Defiance Commission to devise a plan for developing the site. With a $2.2 million federal grant and city funding awarded during Mayor Piper's administration in 2008, an interpretive center and other amenities have resulted.

John E. Piper, Mayor
1999-2002 and 2007-2010

 
Erected 2010 by The City of Clarksville.
 
Location. 36° 32.502′ N, 87° 22.374′ W. Marker is in Clarksville, Tennessee, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from A Street 0.1 miles south of Walker Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 120 Duncan Street, Clarksville TN 37042, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Defiance (a few steps from this marker); Bringing the War to Clarksville (within shouting distance of this marker); Freedmen's Camp and the USCT (within shouting distance of this marker); Life as a Garrisoned Union Soldier (within shouting distance of this marker); Building Fort Sevier (Defiance)
Fort Defiance Interpretive Center dedication plaque. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 31, 2015
3. Fort Defiance Interpretive Center dedication plaque.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Forts Versus Ironclads (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sevier Station (about 800 feet away); Valentine Sevier, Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Clarksville.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Defiance website. (Submitted on January 3, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Center entrance sign. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 31, 2015
4. Center entrance sign.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 157 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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