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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hamm, City of Luxembourg, Luxembourg
 

Military Operations in Western Europe

6 June 1944—8 May 1945

 
 
Military Operations in Western Europe-Left side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 1, 2008
1. Military Operations in Western Europe-Left side of Marker
Inscription. On 6 June 1944, preceded by airborne units and covered by naval and air bombardment, United States and British Commonwealth forces landed on the coast of Normandy. Pushing southward they established a beachhead some 20 miles in depth. On 25 July, in the wake of paralyzing air bombardment, the U.S. First Army broke out of the beachhead and was soon joined by the U.S. Third Army. Together they repulsed a powerful counterattack towards Avranches. Crushed between the Americans on the south and west and the British on the north, attacked continuously by the U.S. Eighth and Ninth Air Forces and the Royal Air Force the enemy retreated across the Seine.

Sustained by the herculean achievements of Army and Navy supply personnel, the Allied Armies and Air Forces pursued vigorously. By mid-September the U.S. Ninth Army had liberated Brest; the First Army was standing on the threshold of Germany, the Third Army had reached the Moselle and had joined the U.S. Seventh and French First Armies advancing northward from the Mediterranean. Progress in the next three months was slow, the fighting bitter. Metz fell as the Third Army moved into the Saar.

The enemy launched, in the Ardennes, his final major counter-offensive on 16 December 1944. Prompt tactical counter-measures and the superb fighting qualities of American soldiers and airmen halted

Military Operations in Western Europe-right side of the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 1, 2008
2. Military Operations in Western Europe-right side of the Marker
this drive. During February and March the West Bank of the Rhine was cleared. In rapid succession American Forces seized a bridge at Remagen, crossed at Oppenheim, then joined the British in the major assault north of the Ruhr. Sweeping across Germany the allies met the advancing troops of the USSR to force the completed surrender of the enemy on 8 May 1945, 337 days after the initial landings in France.
 
Erected by American Battle Monument Commission.
 
Location. 49° 36.734′ N, 6° 11.106′ E. Marker is in Hamm, City of Luxembourg. Marker is on Val du Scheid. Click for map. The marker is located on the grounds of the Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial. Marker is at or near this postal address: 50 Val du Scheid, Hamm, City of Luxembourg 2517, Luxembourg.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker in Luxembourg City).
 
Categories. War, World II
 
Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial-Entrance gate image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 1, 2008
3. Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial-Entrance gate
George S. Patton Jr, General Third Army-grave marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 1, 2008
4. George S. Patton Jr, General Third Army-grave marker
He is buried in Luxembourg American Cemetery.
Luxembourg American Cemetery-View of the many grave markers. image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 1, 2008
5. Luxembourg American Cemetery-View of the many grave markers.
There are 5,076 burials in the cemetery.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 305 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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