“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Superior in Sweetwater County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)


Prospecting Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 9, 2015
1. Prospecting Marker
Caption: Morgan Griffiths
Inscription. In 1900, while prospecting was being carried on in the vicinity of Cumberland, Morgan Griffiths, Gus Paulsen and a party of prospectors went northeast from Rock Springs to prospect in Horse Thief Canyon, since outcrops of a promising deposit of coal were known to exist there.
Only twenty miles out, they established their camp in the picturesque canyon, named by early settlers who claimed that a gang of outlaws had made this their rendezvous and hiding place for their stolen horses. One of the crew was delegated cook for the party, with the understanding that anyone who complained about the cooking would immediately take over the job.
One morning when breakfast was especially inedible, a crew member spoke out unguardedly, stating that the biscuits were nothing but dough, the bacon burnt to a cinder, and the coffee not fit to drink. In the midst of his tirade, he remembered the agreement, and stopped with a smile. “You know, boys, I like everything cooked that way.” The original cook kept his thankless job and the men continued to sit down to their less-than-delectable victuals.
With drinking water from the springs in the vicinity, and wild game, including deer, antelope, and sage chickens in abundance, the crew had all the necessities, and were not dependent on the day’s drive by buckborard and mule
Prospecting Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 9, 2015
2. Prospecting Marker
This marker is second from the right.
to headquarters in Rock Springs.
Morgan Griffiths was a native Welshman who came to America in the late 1870s. Universally liked by all who knew him, he carried on much of the preliminary negotiation work when the United Mine Workers of America organized the miners of the Union Pacific Coal company.
Gus Paulsen, who later became Mayor of Superior and Outside Foreman of mines, had quite a reputation. The miners said he could take a meager lunch, a pocket compass, and a map of any district, no matter how difficult the terrain, and locate the section corners with unerring accuracy. He had the distinction of once refusing a raise in salary when it was offered him, stating that the company was then paying him all that he was worth.
Erected by The People of the Town of South Superior, The Wyoming Department of Environment, Tern Engineering, Western Wyoming Community College, Noel Griffith & Associates, Sweetwater County Commissioners, Linda Tallifero, Larry Calier and Fred Radosovich.
Location. 41° 45.741′ N, 108° 58.085′ W. Marker is in Superior, Wyoming, in Sweetwater County. Marker is on Main Street (Wyoming Route 371) near Berta Street, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 109 Main Street, Superior WY 82945, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Opening the Mines (here, next to this marker); Unions (here, next to this marker); Town Development (a few steps from this marker); Working in the Mines (a few steps from this marker); Immigrants (a few steps from this marker); Superior (a few steps from this marker); Point of Rocks (approx. 10.8 miles away); An Unsolved Mystery (approx. 10.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Superior.
More about this marker. This marker is located at the Miners Union Hall.
Categories. ExplorationIndustry & Commerce
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 287 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement