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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Penn Quarter in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Juliette Gordon Low

The Extra Mile

 

—Points of Light Volunteer Pathway —

 
Juliette Gordon Low Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2015
1. Juliette Gordon Low Marker
Inscription. Juliette Gordon Low Founded Girl Scouts of the United States of America in 1912 to encourage girls to develop and strengthen their leadership skills, to provide support, kindness and compassion to those in need; and to prepare to serve as responsible citizens of their community and country. Her efforts have enabled millions of girls, from 5 to 17, to enjoy fun, friendship and learning opportunities in a nurturing environment.

“The work of today is the history of tomorrow, and we are its makers. ”

October 31, 1860 - January 17, 1927
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Points of Light Volunteer Pathway marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.891′ N, 77° 1.965′ W. Marker is in Penn Quarter, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from G Street Northwest. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1430 G Street Northwest, Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Helen Keller 1880 - 1969 (here, next to this marker); Martin Luther King, Jr. 1929 - 1968 (within shouting distance of this marker); Eunice Kennedy Shriver (within shouting distance of this marker); Cesar Chavez
Juliette Gordon Low Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2015
2. Juliette Gordon Low Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); W. D. Boyce 1858 - 1929 (within shouting distance of this marker); Melvin Jones (within shouting distance of this marker); Ballington and Maud Booth (within shouting distance of this marker); Ernest K. Coulter 1871 - 1952 (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Penn Quarter.
 
Also see . . .  Juliette Gordon Low. Points of Light. (Submitted on January 15, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public Work
 
Juliette Gordon Low Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2015
3. Juliette Gordon Low Marker
Juliette Gordon Low image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 1, 2016
4. Juliette Gordon Low
This portrait of Juliette Gordon Low by Edward Hughes hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

"Elegantly depicted by British artist Edward Hughes, Juliette Gordon Low radiates the luxury of elite American birth and marriage to a wealthy Englishman. Low's satisfaction with her privileged lifestyle, how­ever, soon faded. Following her unfaithful husband's death, she became interested in the Girl Guides, an organization established by her friend, British general Sir Robert Baden-Powell, who had also founded the Boy Scouts. Working with disadvantaged girls living near her Scottish estate, Low became a troop leader, imparting practical skills to her charges. After creating troops in London, Low brought the idea to the United States in 1912, establishing a Girl Guides troop in her hometown of Savannah, Georgia. In 1915, Low incor­porated the Girl Scouts of the USA. Today the organi­zation continues to inspire girls to pursue 'the highest ideals of character, conduct, patriotism, and service that they may become happy and resourceful citizens.'" — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 187 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017.
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