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MARKER DATABASE
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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenwich in Cumberland County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Welcome to Greenwich Township

 
 
Welcome to Greenwich Township Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 18, 2016
1. Welcome to Greenwich Township Marker
Inscription. Greenwich was the principal colonial settlement of Cumberland County, serving as one of New Jersey’s first official ports-of-entry under British rule. While other early settlers, primarily Dutch and Swedish, were the first Europeans to explore this region, it was English settlers that determined the primary character of Greenwich and the role it would play in the creation of a new nation.

Greenwich was founded by John Fenwick in 1675 and Ye Greate Street was laid out by 1684. For thousands of years prior to the arrival of the Europeans, this area supported large settlements of Native American Lenni-Lenape people. Colonization had dire effects on their culture, however, descendants of the Lenape still live throughout the region today and their heritage is preserved in several public collections.

Perhaps the best-known 18th century event was the Greenwich Tea Burning of 1774, one of the five major “tea incidents” in pre-Revolutionary America. In the 19TH century, the critical role that Greenwich played in the operation of the Underground Railroad has also been well-documented, including the fact that the crossing from Delaware to Greenwich, and the road north through Springtown, was a favored route of famed abolitionist Harriet Tubman and many others.

Greenwich was also a major 18th and 19th century Delaware Bay

Welcome to Greenwich Township Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 18, 2016
2. Welcome to Greenwich Township Marker
shipbuilding town and a center of the region’s fishing, oystering and sturgeon industry. Railroad lines ran to Greenwich Piers on the Cohansey River to pick up sturgeon, sturgeon roe (caviar), shad and oysters. There was also a station on Ye Greate Street, located next to a large tomato cannery that served as the main shipping point for fruit and produce. The township’s history and heritage are still evident, reflected in the architecture, the farmlands and the preserved landscapes that the residents of Greenwich have valued for centuries.

(Inscriptions under the images at the bottom-left to right)
Greenwich, c. 1880; Greenwich Piers; Bayside; Ship John Light, Delaware Bay.

(Inscription under the map)
In 1995, the PSEG Estuary Enhancement Program placed over 4,400 acres known as the Bayside Tract under deed of conservation restriction, thereby protecting the property in perpetuity. The Bayside Tract includes 2,585 acres of coastal wetlands that provide habitat for fish, mammals, migratory waterfowl and shorebirds, while supporting several protected bird species including the northern harrier and bald eagle. An additional 1,822 acres of uplands preserve vulnerable habitat for wildlife and allows for continued agricultural activities.
 
Location. 39° 23.395′ N, 75° 20.327′ W. Marker

Cumberland County Prehistoric Museum-Est 1997 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 18, 2016
3. Cumberland County Prehistoric Museum-Est 1997
is in Greenwich, New Jersey, in Cumberland County. Marker is at the intersection of Ye Greate Street and Bridgeton Road on Ye Greate Street. Click for map. The marker is on the lawn of the Cumberland County Prehistorical Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Greenwich NJ 08323, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hot Tea (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Greenwich Tea Burning Monument (about 600 feet away); Gibbon House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Stone Tavern (approx. 0.3 miles away); Wood House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Little Stone School (approx. 0.9 miles away); Baptist Log Meeting House (approx. 4 miles away); Old Broad Street Presbyterain Church (approx. 5.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Greenwich.
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
George Bacon House-1st Postmaster 1811 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 18, 2016
4. George Bacon House-1st Postmaster 1811
Benjamin Reeve-Clockmaker 1737-1801 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 18, 2016
5. Benjamin Reeve-Clockmaker 1737-1801
Kubler Bakery 1893 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 18, 2016
6. Kubler Bakery 1893
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 196 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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