Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Orwell in Addison County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Mount Independence

Bastion of the Revolution

 
 
Mount Independence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
1. Mount Independence Marker
Inscription. Fortification was begun in June of 1776, and the name Mount Independence was bestowed following the Declaration of Independence. Lieut. Col. Jeduthan Baldwin was the chief construction engineer. Here the exhausted American Army, Northern Department, was stationed after withdrawing from its disastrous Canadian Campaign. Built on a rocky plateau and stoutly fortified, the post was a natural stronghold facing any approaching foe from the north. Within its rugged confines thousands of New Englanders, many succumbing to illness and lack of supplies, were quartered. Because of its commanding position and formidable battle works, which made it more powerful at the moment than impaired Ticonderoga, it checked for a year a British thrust southward, until at the fall of its companion fortress across the channel it was evacuated in the early morning darkness of July 6, 1777. This critical year of reprieve gave the American forces time to organize farther south, meet and destroy General Burgoyne at Saratoga, win French support, and eventually subdue General Cornwallis at Yorktown, fulfilling the prophecy of the mountainís name.

Erected by Vermont Society Sons of the American Revolution in observance of the Bicentennial year of Independence, 1976.
 
Erected 1976 by Vermont Society Sons of the American
Marker at Mount Independence image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
2. Marker at Mount Independence
Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Revolutionary War, and the Sons of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 43° 49.225′ N, 73° 23.167′ W. Marker is in Orwell, Vermont, in Addison County. Marker can be reached from Mount Independence Road, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in the picnic grounds of Mount Independence State Historic Site, near the Visitor Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 497 Mount Independence Road, Orwell VT 05760, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Southern Defense Trail (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lake Champlain and the American Revolution (approx. ľ mile away); German Hut – 1777 (approx. 0.3 miles away); The American Southern Defenses – 1776-1777 (approx. 0.3 miles away); British Blockhouse - 1777 (approx. 0.4 miles away); Southern Battery – 1777 (approx. 0.4 miles away); To Repel the Enemy (approx. 0.4 miles away); General Hospital – 1777 (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Orwell.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers are found on the walking trails in Mount Independence State Historic Site.
 
Also see . . .
Mount Independence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July /12/2008
3. Mount Independence Marker
This marker in the picnic grounds can easily go overlooked by most visitors to Mount Independence Historic Site.
 Mount Independence State Historic Site. Vermont State Historic Sites. (Submitted on July 18, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Mount Independence State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
4. Mount Independence State Historic Site
Mount Independence was constructed in 1776 across a narrow channel on Lake Champlain from Fort Ticonderoga. Unlike Ticonderoga, it was built to face north, the direction from which a British attack would come.
Fort Ticonderoga from Mount Independence image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
5. Fort Ticonderoga from Mount Independence
Mount Independence's proximity to Fort Ticonderoga made a formidable obstacle to a British advance from Canada on Lake Champlain. It was abandoned only after Fort Ticonderoga fell to an overland attack.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,574 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement