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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point

 
 
Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 18, 2014
1. Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point Marker
Inscription. At the time of the Gold Rush, Tichenor's Ways built and repaired early wooden steamboats and vessels. Calm but deep water near Steamboat Point helped this industry thrive. Henry B. Tichenor built a marine railways in 1851, but shipbuilding moved south when Pacific Rolling Mills, an ironworks ship builder, moved its operation to Pier 70.

Did you know...
Following the 1850s Gold Rush, real estate along the waterfront could be claimed by sinking a ship and filling the bay around it. The protruding ships were used as warehouses, hotels, jails, homes, brothels, and pretty much anything else imaginable.
 
Erected 2013 by Port of San Francisco.
 
Location. 37° 46.838′ N, 122° 23.307′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is on King Street / The Embarcadero near Townsend Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 King Street, San Francisco CA 94107, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ghost Ship - Lydia (a few steps from this marker); Whaling Out of San Francisco (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Java House
Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 18, 2014
2. Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point Marker
(about 300 feet away); Townsend Street (about 400 feet away); King Street (about 500 feet away); Remnants of Rincon Hill (about 700 feet away); The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse (about 800 feet away); Building the Seawall (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located at the southern end of South Beach Park.
 
Also see . . .  Steamboat Point, 1851-1864 - FoundSF. By 1851, although there were suddenly hundreds of vessels of all sizes and types operating in and out of San Francisco, the city had no facility for hauling or drydocking vessels for bottom-cleaning, caulking, coppering or other repairs below the waterline. To meet this obvious need, Henry B. Tichenor constructed a marine railway at the foot of Second Street in 1851. Then as now, a marine railway consisted of tracks laid out into the water from above the high-tide line. To haul a vessel out of the water, it was maneuvered onto a stout iron-wheeled cradle that was drawn up the inclined railway by a windlass
Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 18, 2014
3. Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point Marker
or capstan. Tichenorís lot, partly land and partly water, with access to deep water close at hand, was ideally suited for ship repair.
(Submitted on March 2, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Tichenorís Ways, the Foot of Second Street image. Click for full size.
By Unknown
4. Tichenorís Ways, the Foot of Second Street
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 172 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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