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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Jenner in Sonoma County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Fort Ross

 
 
Fort Ross Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Hicklin, September 14, 2013
1. Fort Ross Marker
Inscription. This chapel was a part of the settlement founded by the Russians in 1812 and known as Fort Ross. The fort was in the form of a quadrangle, about 300 feet square, inclosed by a redwood wall, with two blockhouses at opposite corners. Fort Ross contained Fifty-nine buildings, nine of which, including this chapel, were within the inclosure. The Russians withdrew in 1841, selling their improvements and stock to John A. Sutter of Sutter's Fort. Property acquired by the State of California in 1906.
 
Erected 1928 by Historic Landmarks Committee, Native Sons of the Golden West.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 38° 30.871′ N, 123° 14.581′ W. Marker is in Jenner, California, in Sonoma County. Marker can be reached from Fort Ross Road ľ mile west of Coast Highway (California Route 1), on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Fort Ross is on Fort Ross Road, about 11.5 miles north of Jenner, California at the mouth of the Russian River. Going north, turn left onto Fort Ross Road and in 1/4 mile turn left again into the parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Jenner CA 95450, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are
View from South-West - Fort Ross, Russian Chapel, Fort Ross, Sonoma County, CA image. Click for full size.
By Roger Sturtevant, February 10, 1934
2. View from South-West - Fort Ross, Russian Chapel, Fort Ross, Sonoma County, CA
The marker is visible here, just to the right of the chapel entrance, at what was probably its original location.

The chapel was nearly destroyed in the earthquake of April 1906, leaving only the roof and associated structures intact. The chapel was restored, 1915-1917, with significant additional alterations undertaken during repairs, 1955-57. Fire destroyed the chapel on October 5, 1970, with a complete reconstruction of the chapel completed on the same site in 1973. (Photo courtesy of the Historic American Building Survey)
within walking distance of this marker. The Russian Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Russian Village Site - Sloboda (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Ross Defenses (about 300 feet away); Sandy Beach Cove (about 500 feet away); The Native Alaskan Village (about 600 feet away); Fort Ross Cove (about 600 feet away); California's First Windmill (about 700 feet away); The Call Family Residence (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Jenner.
 
More about this marker. This marker is inside the stockade at Fort Ross State Historical Park. It is mounted on the inside wall of the fort, near the entrance to the chapel and, more-or-less, behind the framework that holds the chapel bell.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Ross State Historic Park. Fort Ross was a thriving Russian-American Company settlement from 1812 to 1841. This commercial company chartered by Russia's tsarist government controlled all Russian exploration, trade and settlement in the North Pacific, and established permanent settlements in Alaska and California. Fort Ross was the southernmost settlement in the Russian colonization of the North American continent, and was established as an agricultural base to supply Alaska. It was the site of California's first windmills
Russian Colonists of 1812 image. Click for full size.
By James King
3. Russian Colonists of 1812
An article from The Grizzly Bear, once the official organ of the Native Sons of the Golden West and the Native Daughters of the Golden West, from January of the same year that the plaque was dedicated, 1926.
and shipbuilding, and Russian scientists were among the first to record Californiaís cultural and natural history. Fort Ross was a successfully functioning multi-cultural settlement for some thirty years. Settlers included Russians, Native Alaskans and Californians, and Creoles (individuals of mixed Russian and native ancestry.)
(Submitted on September 26, 2013, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

2. Fort Ross Conservancy. Fort Ross, one of the main tourist attractions between Bodega Bay and Fort Bragg, is a California State Historic Park showcasing a historic Russian-era fort compound that has been designated National Historic Landmark status. (Submitted on September 26, 2013, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

3. The History of Fort Ross. (Submitted on September 26, 2013, by James King of San Miguel, California.)
4. Fort Ross State Historic Park. Fort Ross State Historic Park, a California State Park located on the coast of Sonoma County, was established as one of the first State Parks in 1908. The name, derived from the word for Russia (Rossiia), was originally established by the Russian American Company, a commercial hunting and trading company chartered by the tsarist government, with shares held by the members of the Tsarís family, court
Fort Ross - Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key
4. Fort Ross - Chapel
nobility and high officials. This history is very unique along the California Coast. To learn more about this amazing place please visit our history section.
(Submitted on September 26, 2013, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

5. Renova Fort Ross Foundation. The Renova Fort Ross Foundation is a public charitable foundation dedicated to Fort Ross State Historic Park. Our mission is to promote the preservation and to raise awareness of Fort Ross throughout the United States and Russia. (Submitted on September 27, 2013, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesSettlements & Settlers
 
Fort Ross Marker Dedication image. Click for full size.
5. Fort Ross Marker Dedication
This photo from the Sonoma Public Library is titled "Group of Bay Area Native Sons of the Golden West at the Fort Ross Chapel" and shows the marker in its original location. Date unknown but probably at the time of the dedication.
Fort Ross Marker Dedication image. Click for full size.
6. Fort Ross Marker Dedication
Sebastapol Parlor Native Sons gather for the dedication.
The Grizzly Bear - November 1928, p.6 image. Click for full size.
By James King
7. The Grizzly Bear - November 1928, p.6
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by James King of San Miguel, California. This page has been viewed 375 times since then and 32 times this year. Last updated on , by James King of San Miguel, California. Photos:   1. submitted on , by James King of San Miguel, California.   2. submitted on .   3. submitted on , by James King of San Miguel, California.   4. submitted on , by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.   5, 6. submitted on , by James King of San Miguel, California.   7. submitted on , by James King of San Miguel, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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