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Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Ida B. Wells

1862–1931

 
 
Ida B. Wells Marker image. Click for full size.
By R. E. Smith, March 19, 2008
1. Ida B. Wells Marker
Inscription. Ida B. Wells crusaded against lynchings in Memphis and the South. In 1892 while editor of the Memphis Free Speech, located in this vicinity, she wrote of the lynching of three Black businessmen. As a result, her newspaper office was destroyed and her life threatened.

After moving to New York, she began an international speaking tour where she influenced the establishment of the British Anti-Lynching Society. She cofounded the NAACP in America and organized the first Black women’s political organization. A Chicago housing project is named in her honor.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 4E 85.)
 
Location. 35° 8.363′ N, 90° 3.067′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker is on Beale Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Cannot be seen by car as Beale St. is limited to pedestrian traffic. Marker is in this post office area: Memphis TN 38103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pee Wee Saloon (a few steps from this marker); Beale Street Historic District (within shouting distance of this marker); Rufus Thomas, Jr. (within shouting
Ida B. Wells Marker (reverse side) image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, May 18, 2010
2. Ida B. Wells Marker (reverse side)
distance of this marker); Nat D. Williams (within shouting distance of this marker); Hooks Brothers Photography (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Blues Trail From Mississippi to Memphis (about 400 feet away); The Memphis Home of W.C. Handy (about 600 feet away); Lansky Brothers (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Memphis.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Her Passion for Justice. by Lee D. Baker. Biography. Includes portrait. (Submitted on March 6, 2006.) 

2. NAACP Profiles in Courage. (Submitted on March 20, 2008.)
3. Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases. By Ida B. Wells-Barnett. 1892. Project Gutenberg. (Submitted on October 28, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. humanitarian, NAACP - National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsNotable EventsNotable Persons
 
Ida B. Wells Marker image. Click for full size.
By Amber, March 3, 2006
3. Ida B. Wells Marker
Ida B. Wells-Barnett image. Click for full size.
1893
4. Ida B. Wells-Barnett
This c.1893 photo of Ida B. Wells-Barnett by Mary Garrity hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“The daughter of former slaves, Ida B. Wells sued the Chesapeake, Ohio, and Southwestern Railway in 1883 after being dragged from her seat for refusing to move to a segregated railcar. Her anger over this incident spurred her to begin contributing articles to black-owned newspapers; she became part owner and editor of the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight in 1889. After three black businessmen were lynched in Memphis in 1892, Wells launched what became a four-decade-long anti-lynching crusade. She vigorously investigated other lynchings and published her groundbreaking treatise on the topic, Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Amber of Granville, Ohio. This page has been viewed 3,984 times since then and 63 times this year. Last updated on , by R. E. Smith of Nashville, Tennessee. Photos:   1. submitted on , by R. E. Smith of Nashville, Tennessee.   2. submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   3. submitted on , by Amber of Granville, Ohio.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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