“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Orlando in Orange County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)

Eppes-Shine Plot Greenwood Cemetery

Eppes-Shine Plot Greenwood Cemetery Marker-Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, July 28, 2015
1. Eppes-Shine Plot Greenwood Cemetery Marker-Side 1
Inscription. (side 1)
Buried here are members of the Eppes and Shine families, descendants of President Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence and the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, and the father of the University of Virginia. Francis Wayles Eppes VII, Jefferson's grandson, was born in 1801 to Maria Jefferson and John Eppes. He spent his childhood in the care of Jefferson, who encouraged interests in religion, public service, and education. In 1829, Eppes moved to Tallahassee, where he grew cotton and served as a justice of the peace and intendant (mayor). He helped found St John's Episcopal Church and promoted public schools. He secured the location for the West Florida Seminary, a precursor to Florida State University, and led its governing board through turbulent times. By 1869, Eppes had moved to Orlando to spend his final years as a citrus farmer at his home, Pine Hill on Lake Pineloch. He helped found the First Episcopal Church, now the Cathedral of St. Luke's. After a lifetime of public service and civic leadership, Francis Eppes died on May 30, 1881.
(Continued on other side)
(side 2)
(Continued from other side)
The Shines were among Orlando's earliest civic-minded families. Three Shine brothers married three daughteres of Francis Eppes, and two
Eppes-Shine Plot Greenwood Cemetery Marker-Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, July 28, 2015
2. Eppes-Shine Plot Greenwood Cemetery Marker-Side 2
of the brothers and their families followed Eppes from Tallahassee to Orlando at the end of the 1860s. David S. Shine, married to Caroline Eppes, became deputy clerk of Orange County and was later appointed postmaster. Captain Thomas J. Shine, married to Martha Eppes, was the director of the First National Bank, a board of trade officer, an alderman, and commander of the Orlando Guards, later named Shine Guards. In 1879, Thomas built a home on Orange Avenue with the first indoor bathroom in Orlando. He named the cross street Jefferson Street in honor of his wife's family. Martha and Caroline Shine served their communities as members of the Rosalind Club, Sorosis, and other charities. The third Shine brother, Dr. William F. Shine, served as a Civil War surgeon and practiced medicine in St. Augustine after the war. He was married to Maria Jefferson Eppes, who founded the St. Augustine Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution that bears her name. The Eppes-Shine family is remembered as one of Orlando's most influential families.
Erected 2014 by The City of Orlando and the Florida Department of State. (Marker Number F-838.)
Location. 28° 31.936′ N, 81° 21.43′ W. Marker is in Orlando, Florida, in Orange County. Marker can be reached from
Eppes-Shine Plot image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, July 28, 2015
3. Eppes-Shine Plot
Taken from next to the marker.
Greenwood Street 0.3 miles east of South Mills Avenue when traveling east. Click for map. The entrance to Greenwood Cemetery is off Greenwood Street. To access marker, enter cemetery and go to the extreme southern end near Gore Street. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1603 Greenwood Street, Orlando FL 32801, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. H. H. Dickson Azalea Park/Washington Street Bridge (approx. 0.8 miles away); Orlando Reeves (approx. 1.1 miles away); "Lest We Forget" (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Soldiers, The Sailors, The Statesmen (approx. 1.2 miles away); Mathew Robinson Marks (approx. 1.2 miles away); J. P. Musselwhite & Family (approx. 1.2 miles away); Linton E. Allen Memorial Fountain (approx. 1.2 miles away); Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Orlando.
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial Sites
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. This page has been viewed 138 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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