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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tombstone in Cochise County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Rose Tree

Museum

 
 
Rose Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 13, 2011
1. Rose Tree Marker
Inscription.
In 1934, Robert Ripley
declares the Rose Bush
the World's Largest in the
Newspaper column
"Believe it or Not".

The fire of May 26th, 1882, destroyed the dwellings located here. In 1885, Mrs. Amelia Adamson built the Cochise House Hotel. That same year, Mrs. Adamson and Mrs. Mary Gee, a hotel guest, planted the rose bush in the hotel patio. The Rose bush had been sent to Mrs. Gee by a relative in Scotland. By 1909, the Cochise House was renamed as the Arcade Hotel and Annex. It was described as "iron clad adobe". In the 1920s, new owners, James and Ethel Macia, built the steel pipe and wood post trellis that supports the Rose Tree. In 1936 the Arcade was renamed the Rose Tree Inn in honor of the Rose Tree. The Inn was a popular boarding house until it closed in 1953. In 1964 the Hotel was incorporated into the Rose Tree Museum, which remains today.
 
Erected 2005 by Tombstone Restoration Commission. (Marker Number 35.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Believe It or Not marker series.
 
Location. 31° 42.723′ N, 110° 4.043′ W. Marker is in Tombstone, Arizona, in Cochise County. Marker is at the intersection of 4th South Street and
Rose Tree Inn and Markers image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 13, 2011
2. Rose Tree Inn and Markers
This marker is mounted on the wall to the left of the far right door. The Historic American Building Survey plaque is seen at the left.
Toughnut Street, on the right when traveling north on 4th South Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 118 South 4th Street, Tombstone AZ 85638, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Southern Pacific Train Depot (within shouting distance of this marker); Cochise County Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); The Grand Hotel (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Can Can Restaurant (about 300 feet away); Campbell & Hatch Saloon and Billiard Parlor (about 300 feet away); City Marshall Virgil Earp (about 400 feet away); Owl Cafe and Tourist Hotel (about 400 feet away); The Oriental Saloon (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Tombstone.
 
Regarding Rose Tree. In 1885, Mrs. Amelia Adamson built the Cochise House Hotel. That same year, Mrs. Adamson and Mrs. Mary Gee, a hotel guest, planted the rose bush in the hotel patio. The Rose bush had been sent to Mrs. Gee by a relative in Scotland. By 1909, the Cochise House was renamed as the Arcade Hotel and Annex. It was described as "iron clad adobe". In the 1920's, new owners, James and Ethel Macia, built the steel pipe and wood post trellis that supports the Rose Tree. In 1936 the Arcade was renamed the Rose Tree Inn in honor of the Rose Tree. The Inn was popular boarding house
Underneath the Rose Tree image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 13, 2011
3. Underneath the Rose Tree
until it closed in 1953. In 1964 the Hotel was incorporated into the Rose Tree Museum, which remains today.
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryIndustry & Commerce
 
Top of the Rose Tree image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 13, 2011
4. Top of the Rose Tree
Rose Tree image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 14, 2011
5. Rose Tree
Rose Tree image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 14, 2011
6. Rose Tree
Historic American Building Survey Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose
7. Historic American Building Survey Plaque
This structure has been
recorded by the
Historic American
Buildings Survey

of the United States Department
of the Interior for the Archives
at the Library of Congress.
Rose Tree Inn Museum image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 14, 2011
8. Rose Tree Inn Museum
Rose Tree - Located within the Rose Tree Patio Area. image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 14, 2011
9. Rose Tree - Located within the Rose Tree Patio Area.
The picture of the "World's Largest Rose Bush", that has been given you, was taken during the blooming in the month of April. The rose is a white Lady Banksia and the root was sent from Scotland in 1885. The bush was planted to climb over the woodshed. Mr. Macia tore down the shed and built a trellis.
The bush does not require feeding or spraying, but it does require pruning and watering. Several truck loads of brush are pruned from the bush each January. The blossom is a small white rose growing in clusters.
When Robert Ripley first called this bush "the world's largest" it was one-fourth its present size. It now covers more than 8,000 square feet. Walk under the bush out into the backyard, this the best view. You are welcome to take pictures.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 110,642 times since then and 158 times this year. Last updated on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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