“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)

Lieut. Col. Edmund Rice

Lieut. Col. Edmund Rice Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 19, 2016
1. Lieut. Col. Edmund Rice Marker
The Congress
Lieut. Col. Edmund Rice
19th Mass. Vols
for conspicuous bravery on the 3rd day of Gettysburg.

Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
Location. 38° 52.413′ N, 77° 4.243′ W. Marker is in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker can be reached from Miles Avenue. Click for map. The marker and grave are at the far east end of Miles Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Arlington VA 22214, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Walter Reed, M.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); 96th Infantry Division, U.S. Army (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 423rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion (about 400 feet away); Berlin Airlift (about 400 feet away); The Peacemaker (about 400 feet away); USS Serpens Memorial (about 600 feet away); Americal Division (about 700 feet away); First Marine Division Association (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Arlington National Cemetery.
Regarding Lieut. Col. Edmund Rice. His Medal of Honor citation read: Conspicuous bravery on the third day of the battle on the countercharge against
Lieut. Col. Edmund Rice Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 19, 2016
2. Lieut. Col. Edmund Rice Marker
The marker is unique in that it is a large version of the Medal of Honor and its reverse, attached to Brig. Gen. Rice and his wife Elizabeth's grave.
Pickett's division where he fell severely wounded within the enemy's lines.

More about this award: "The conspicuous gallantry of Major Edmund Rice, of the 19th. Mass. Vols. Infantry, at the third day's battle of Gettysburg, where he was severely wounded, did more than the single exertion of any other officer on our side to retrieve the day after the battle had been virtually won by the Confederates, who had broken our lines, and were cheering and swinging their hats on our captured guns. After the line was broken, the 19th dashed in and placed themselves in the rear of the break, and for twelve minutes received the enemy's fire, at a distance of less than fifteen paces. In that time one man in every two of the whole regiment, and seven fell over, including Rice, who was shot in front of his men with his foot on the body of a fallen Confederate, he being at that moment the officer fighting nearest to the enemy in our whole line. He fought till he fell; his men fought till they fell. He held Pickett's heavy column in check with the single thin line of his regiment, till reinforcements came from right and left..."

"Rice's regiment lost three-fourths of its force in that awful struggle, but its victorious remnants brought off the field the captured battleflags of the 14th, 19th, 53rd and 57th Virginia Regiments. When Webb's Brigade broke, the writer, recognizing
Brig. Gen. Edmund Rice grave image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 19, 2016
3. Brig. Gen. Edmund Rice grave
The grave inscription reads:
Edmund Rice
1842 1906
Brigadier General
United States Army
Elizabeth H. Rice 1918
fully the crisis of the moment, listened impatiently for the expected order to meet it, but except Rice's cry to follow him, heard no such order, and believes that none other was given."

(from War Department Records related to the Award, according to Nitch)
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of San Salvador, El Salvador. This page has been viewed 107 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of San Salvador, El Salvador. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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