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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ashford in Windham County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Ashford

 
 
Ashford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 27, 2016
1. Ashford Marker
Inscription.
This area, part of the Wabbaquasset Indian country, was deeded to Captain James Fitch of Norwich in 1684 by Owaneco, sachem of the Mohegans. An earlier one having failed to act, a new committee was appointed by the General Assembly in May, 1710 to lay out the township. In October, 1714 further town privileges were granted and liberty to settle a minister and erect a meetinghouse. William Ward and John Perry were chosen as selectmen at the first town meeting, held early in 1715. This green was the center of town before the separation of Eastford in 1847. The First Church of Ashford, Congregational, organized November 26, 1718 with James Hale as minister, stood on this common. It was twice destroyed by fire and a third time by the 1938 hurricane. The Babcock Burial Ground, where many of the original settlers are buried, lies in the northwest corner of the green beyond the Ashford Academy, erected early in the 1800’s.

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While the school was being built in 1825, the Academy Association added an upper story for advanced students. Among the important persons who received their early education here was General Edward Whitaker, awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for gallantry during the Civil War. Under a flag of truce he received assurance that General Lee would surrender unconditionally at Appomattox
Ashford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 27, 2016
2. Ashford Marker
in 1865. Ashford was the birthplace of Colonel Thomas Knowlton, commander of the Knowlton Rangers in the Revolutionary War. He marched to Lexington with seventy-eight of Ashford’s men. Only eight Connecticut towns furnished more. Knowlton, as second in command of Connecticut forces, defended the rail fence at Bunker Hill. He was killed in the Battle of Harlem Heights. Early in the 19th century Ashford had a number of grain and saw mills, several tanneries, a cotton mill, and a glass factory. The railroads, however, bypassed this area, and Ashford now is agricultural in economy and a residence for many commuters to other towns.
 
Erected 1980 by Town of Ashford, the Ashford Historical Society, and the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 52.354′ N, 72° 7.375′ W. Marker is in Ashford, Connecticut, in Windham County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 44 and Fitts Road, on the right when traveling west on U.S. 44. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ashford CT 06278, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pomfret (approx. 6.5 miles away); This Edifice (approx. 7.2 miles away); Willington
Ashford Academy image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 27, 2016
3. Ashford Academy
The Academy is believed to be the oldest public building in Ashford and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.
(approx. 7.3 miles away); Brooklyn (approx. 10.7 miles away); Israel Putnam (approx. 10.7 miles away); Captain Nathan Hale Monument (approx. 11.9 miles away); Tantiusques (approx. 12.2 miles away in Massachusetts).
 
Also see . . .
1. Ashford’s history. (Submitted on April 4, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Ashford Academy. (Submitted on April 4, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. Thomas Knowlton. (Submitted on April 4, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
4. General Edward Whitaker. (Submitted on April 4, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraEducationPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 157 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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