Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Clayton in Contra Costa County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

History of Marsh Creek Springs

 
 
History of Marsh Creek Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2016
1. History of Marsh Creek Springs Marker
Inscription. Founded in 1927 by Gerald (Jerry) Gill and family, the park consisted of four picnic sections, over forty acres, four baseball diamonds, two swimming pools, a wading pool for children, large dance hall and two snack bars.
At one time the grounds entertained 5,000 people on a week end arriving in over 1,200 cars.
In 1957 a cloudburst on the east side of Mt. Diablo sent a twelve foot torrent of water down Marsh Creek destroying the park.
Rebuilt that year - it was again destroyed in 1962 by a second - flood.
In 1964 the John and Eloise McHugh family purchased the area, known as section number one, and began restoring its beauty.
 
Location. 37° 53.524′ N, 121° 51.103′ W. Marker is near Clayton, California, in Contra Costa County. Marker can be reached from Marsh Creek Road near Aspara Drive. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12510 Marsh Creek Road, Clayton CA 94517, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Marsh Creek Springs (within shouting distance of this marker); Mount Diablo (approx. 3.5 miles away); Mount Diablo Beacon: (approx. 3.5 miles away); Mt Diablo State Park
History of Marsh Creek Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2016
2. History of Marsh Creek Springs Marker
(approx. 3.5 miles away); Greenhouse Portal (approx. 4.4 miles away); Somersville Townsite (approx. 4.6 miles away); Mount Diablo Coal Field (approx. 4.6 miles away); Independent Mine (approx. 4.6 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker is across the foot bridge in the picnic ground on the east side of Marsh Creek.
 
Categories. EntertainmentNatural FeaturesWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 134 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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