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Ashland in Clay County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Clay County and the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 / Clay County and the Creek Indian Confederacy

 
 
Clay County and the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 7, 2016
1. Clay County and the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 Marker
Inscription.
Side 1
Clay County and the
Creek Indian War of 1813-14

During the Creek Indian War of 1813-14, a subset of the War of 1812 with England, numerous figures prominent in American history marched over what would become Clay County. Such men as Andrew Jackson and Sam Houston traveled through the future county as they moved back and forth from forts along the Coosa River to battle sites on Hillabee, Emuckfaw, and Enitachopko creeks, as well as the Tallapoosa River. General Jackson and his troops spent a total of 18 days and traveled over 230 miles within the future county's borders. His army used major arteries such as the McIntosh Trail through what is now central Clay County, the Chapman Road through the southern part of the county, and numerous Creek Indian trails during the various campaigns of the war. Jackson and other men in his army left their names on numerous counties and towns in Alabama. Traveling with General Jackson through the future county during the war were famous Indian allies from the Choctaw, Cherokee, and Creek White Stick tribes such as Pushmataha, Sequoyah, Timpooche Barnard, Selocta, and William McIntosh.

Side 2
Clay County and the
Creek Indian Confederacy

The loss of 22.5 million acres of Creek Indian
Clay County and the Creek Indian Confederacy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 7, 2016
2. Clay County and the Creek Indian Confederacy Marker
lands in the surrender treaty of Fort Jackson in August 1814 left the Creeks with only 5.2 million acres. The future Clay County would be near the center of this downsized Creek Confederacy. Several important Creek Indian trails passed through the future county. Among the Creek Indian towns in the area where the mother town of Hillabee (near Pinckneyville) and its four satellite villages of Enitachopko (at Bluff Springs), Lanudshi Apala (at Millerville), Echoise Ligua (north of Hackneyville) and Oktasassi (south of Hackneyville). Co-located with the Hillabee mother town was Scotsman Robert Grierson's trading post and factory, which also played prominently in Creek Indian history. President George Washington's invitation letter to the Creek leadership was delivered to Chief Alexander McGillivray while he was visiting at the Grierson complex in 1790. This invitation led to America's initial contact and treaty with the Alabama Creeks. Other noted Red Stick Creeks , such as William Weatherford, Menawa, Peter McQueen, and Opithle Yahola, also left their footprints in the red soil of Clay County.

Written by Don East

 
Erected 2013 by the Alabama Tourism Department and the County of Clay.
 
Location. 33° 16.444′ N, 85° 50.153′ 
Marker in front of Courthouse under the tree. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 7, 2016
3. Marker in front of Courthouse under the tree.
W. Marker is in Ashland, Alabama, in Clay County. Marker is at the intersection of Court Square (Alabama Route 9) and 1st Avenue North, on the right when traveling west on Court Square. Click for map. Located on the grounds of the Clay County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 25 Court Square, Ashland AL 36251, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Clay County Veterans Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Clay County / Clay County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Ashland, Alabama (within shouting distance of this marker); First Baptist Church of Ashland (approx. half a mile away); John Richmond McCain (approx. 5.2 miles away); Lineville Alabama Monument (approx. 5.3 miles away); Goldville (approx. 13.5 miles away); Battle of Enitachopko (approx. 14.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Ashland.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on the Creek Indian War. (Submitted on June 8, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US IndianWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 196 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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