Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Old Glory in Stonewall County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Mackenzie Trail

 
 
The Mackenzie Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 7, 2016
1. The Mackenzie Trail Marker
Inscription. The Mackenzie Trail was a significant route in Texas history. French explorer Pierre Vial and Spanish explorer Jose Mares used parts of the trail in separate expeditions (1786-88); Captain Randolph B. Marcy (1849), and Robert E. Lee (1856) came through the area as well. In 1871, Colonel Ranald Mackenzie sent Tonkawa scouts and cavalrymen from Fort Griffin to find a trail to the High Plains which they could employ in a campaign against the Northern Comanches and their allies, the Kiowas, in response to an attack. The trail crossed the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River (.5 mi SE) and followed it west to Double Mountain by way of Cottonwood Spring (2 mi W), which was used historically by indigenous peoples and later became part of the Comanche war trail system. The trail then went northwest to the Caprock. Mackenzie led 600 troops along this trail in pursuit of the Native Americans in 1871 and in later expeditions. The route was also used during the Red River War (1874-75).
†††††In 1876, Charles C. Rath established Rath City on the trail (15 mi W), using the route to capitalize on the buffalo hid business. As the era of the open range ended in the 1880s, farmers bought property and settled in the area, establishing a number of rural communities. Meanwhile, large ranches were established, including W.F. Raynerís Call Bar Ranch.
The Mackenzie Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 7, 2016
2. The Mackenzie Trail Marker
Rayner also established the Rayner community, located on the Mackenzie Trail; it became Stonewall Countyís first county seat in 1889. By 1909, the trail was replaced by the Stamford & Northwestern Railroad. In less than 40 years of formal use, the Mackenzie Trail significantly influenced the development of Stonewall County and the Southern and Rolling Plains.
 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16163.)
 
Location. 33° 5.76′ N, 100° 0.452′ W. Marker is near Old Glory, Texas, in Stonewall County. Marker is on State Highway 283 half a mile south of County Road 139, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Aspermont TX 79502, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Glory (approx. 3.6 miles away); Texas Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway (approx. 11.7 miles away); Rath City (approx. 11.7 miles away); a different marker also named The Mackenzie Trail (approx. 14.7 miles away); "The Poet Ranchman" Larry Chittenden (approx. 15.3 miles away); Texas Cowboy Reunion Oldtimers' Association (approx. 15.3 miles away); First AQHA Show (approx. 15.3 miles away); Stamford (approx. 15.5 miles away).
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesWars, US Indian
 
The Mackenzie Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 7, 2016
3. The Mackenzie Trail Marker
View to west across State Highway 283
View to South from State Highway 283 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 7, 2016
4. View to South from State Highway 283
Trail crossing over the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River is at center left of image
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 263 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement