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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cape Elizabeth in Cumberland County, Maine — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Annie C. McGuire Shipwreck Memorial

 
 
Annie C. McGuire Shipwreck Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 18, 1998
1. Annie C. McGuire Shipwreck Memorial Marker
Inscription. Annie C. McGuire shipwrecked here Christmas Eve 1886.
 
Location. 43° 37.395′ N, 70° 12.459′ W. Marker is in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, in Cumberland County. Marker is on Off Shore Road. Click for map. The marker is on the grounds of Portland Head Light-Fort Williams Park. Marker is in this post office area: Cape Elizabeth ME 04107, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Portland Head Light (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S.S. Eagle-56 (PE-56) (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Civilian Conservation Corps (about 400 feet away); Fort Williams (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Williams (about 600 feet away); A Town Within A Town (about 600 feet away); CCC Headquarters (about 600 feet away); Battery Blair (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Cape Elizabeth.
 
Regarding Annie C. McGuire Shipwreck Memorial. Annie C. Maguire
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History
United Kingdom

Name: Annie C. Maguire
Launched: 1853
Fate: Wrecked, 24 December 1886
General characteristics [1]

Type: Barque

Tonnage: 1,363 tons
Length: 188
Portland Head Light image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 18, 1998
2. Portland Head Light
ft (57 m)
Complement: 14
Annie C. Maguire was a British three-masted bark, sailing from Buenos Aires on 24 December 1886, when she struck the ledge at Portland Head Light, Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Lighthouse Keeper Joshua Strout, his son, wife, and volunteers rigged an ordinary ladder as a gangplank between the shore and the ledge the ship was heeled against. Captain O'Neil, the ship's master, his wife, two mates and the nine-man crew clambered onto the ledge and then, one by one, crossed the ladder to safety.
The cause of the wreck is puzzling since visibility was not a problem. Members of the crew reported they "plainly saw Portland Light before the disaster and are unable to account for same."
Today, letters painted on the rocks below the lighthouse commemorate the wreck and the Christmas Eve rescue
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
U.S. Coast Guard Light Station Portland Head, Cape Elizabeth, Maine image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 18, 1998
3. U.S. Coast Guard Light Station Portland Head, Cape Elizabeth, Maine
Sign at the entrance to Fort Williams Park image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 18, 1998
4. Sign at the entrance to Fort Williams Park
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 108 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 27, 2016.
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