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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Claflin in Barton County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Wings Over the Water

Miracles of Migration

 
 
Wings Over the Water Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 13, 2016
1. Wings Over the Water Marker
Inscription.

"The stork in the heavens knoweth her appointed time; and the turtle dove, and the crane, and the swallow, observed the time of their coming" —Jeremiah (8:7)

For thousands of years, we have marveled at bird migration. How could we not? Scientists report that a godwit tracked by satellite flew 7,145 miles without landing. But feats that amaze us are routine for birds that fly such distances every year. Consider the migratory birds that frequent our wetlands. Many breed in the arctic, then fly south as far as the tip of South America. Along the way, these birds depend on a network of wetlands for rest and refueling.

The marshes of the Texas Gulf Coast, the Great Salt Plains of Oklahoma, Quivira and Cheyenne Bottoms here in Kansas, the Rainwater Basin in Nebraska, and the Missouri Couteu region of North Dakota and Canada are interconnected by the birds that migrate between them. For waterfowl and shorebirds, these wetlands are like stepping stones across a stream. One missing stone can be ruinous.

Fat for Flight
Shorebirds often arrive at our wetlands with little fat for continuing migration. Simply put, they are out of gas. Once here, though, they may double their body weight. Shorebirds may fatten to a point where an extra ounce would prevent them from taking off!

Motion

Prey and Play and Wings Over the Water Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
2. Prey and Play and Wings Over the Water Markers
Looking SSW, with Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area waters seen in distance
and Change
Scientists have many high-tech ways to monitor bird migration. Much of what we now know came from researchers who worked before the days of satellites and radio transmitters. Local bird banders, like Frank Robl and Ed Martinez, labored tirelessly to net, measure, band, and release birds, illuminating the migration miracle.
 
Erected by Wetlands & Wildlife National Scenic Byway, Kansas Dept of Transportation, and Federal Highway Administration.
 
Location. 38° 31.309′ N, 98° 37.362′ W. Marker is near Claflin, Kansas, in Barton County. Marker is on Kansas Route 4 0.2 miles east of NE 80th Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Wetlands & Wildlife National Scenic Byway Pullout, Claflin KS 67525, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Prey and Play (here, next to this marker); Wetlands & Wildlife National Scenic Byway (approx. 4.6 miles away); Settling the "Great American Desert" (approx. 4.6 miles away); Robert E. "Bob" Vohs Tribute (approx. 8.4 miles away); Hotel Wolf (approx. 11.8 miles away);
Wetlands & Wildlife National Scenic Byway Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 13, 2016
3. Wetlands & Wildlife National Scenic Byway Kiosk
Fort Zarah (approx. 11.9 miles away); Site of Fort Zarah (approx. 11.9 miles away); ATSF Locomotive No. 3416 (approx. 12.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Claflin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Bird Watching at Cheyenne Bottoms, Kansas Wetlands Education Center. (Submitted on July 11, 2016, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. History of Cheyenne Bottoms, Kansas. (Submitted on July 11, 2016, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area Brochure. (Submitted on July 11, 2016, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Western Hemisphere Migratory Species Initiative. (Submitted on July 11, 2016, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
5. "Mesmerizing Migration" Map at The Cornell Lab of Ornithology. (Submitted on July 11, 2016, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. AnimalsEnvironment
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 131 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on July 11, 2016.
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