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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cranbury in Middlesex County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Second Presbyterian Church of Cranbury

 
 
The Second Presbyterian Church of Cranbury Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stephen Kokoska, July 15, 2016
1. The Second Presbyterian Church of Cranbury Marker
Inscription.
The Sexton's House
The adjacent private home located at 3 Westminster Place was constructed in 1840 as the home of the Sexton of the Church. As with most historic homes in Cranbury, this house has been modified since its original construction.

The Church Chapel (also later known as the Westminster House) formerly stood in the area of the current driveway of the Sexton's House. This Chapel became the Cranbury Youth Center in 1945 and was utilized for numerous community functions. The building remained in that location for several decades after the Church was razed.

On the property across the street from the Sexton's House stood horse sheds used to house the horses for those attending services at the Church. The current garage for the Sexton's House was rebuilt in the 1970's from the last of those horse sheds.

Second Presbyterian Chruch
On this site stood the Second Presbyterian Church of Cranbury, constructed in 1838 on Church Street, now Westminster Place. In 1837, a number of members of the First Presbyterian Church decided to withdraw from the Church and erect a new house of worship on this property.

The Second Presbyterian Church served its members for almost a century until the re-unification of the First and Second Presbyterian congregations in 1935. This merger was accomplished largely

The Second Presbyterian Church of Cranbury Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stephen Kokoska, July 15, 2016
2. The Second Presbyterian Church of Cranbury Marker
through the efforts of Rev. Frank B. Everitt, who served as pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church from 1929-1935. The Church building was torn down a year later in 1936.

Westminster Cemetery and Monument
Westminster Cemetery was initially established for the congregation (and relations) of the Second Presbyterian Church. These burial grounds were later opened to members of the First Presbyterian Church (and relations) after the merger of the two churches. The cemetery is now open to all, regardless of religious affiliation.

Visitors are encouraged to visit the monument constructed in 1940 on the original site of the Church. This monument was erected to perpetuate the memory of the Second Presbyterian Church and to honor the ten pastors who served this Church. This monument may be viewed on the cemetery property behind this sign.

Specific individual plot locations and additional grave site information can be found at www.cranbury.org/history/Cemetery
 
Location. 40° 18.842′ N, 74° 30.835′ W. Marker is in Cranbury, New Jersey, in Middlesex County. Marker is at the intersection of Westminster Place and Wesley Place, on the left when traveling east on Westminster Place. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cranbury NJ 08512, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers

Sexton's House image. Click for full size.
By Stephen Kokoska, July 15, 2016
3. Sexton's House
are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Todd Beamer (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Cranbury Dam (approx. 0.3 miles away); Site of Encampment (approx. 0.3 miles away); Cranberry Mills (approx. 0.4 miles away); The First Presbyterian Church and Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); Site of House of Dr. Hezekiah Stites (approx. 0.7 miles away); Parsonage Barn (approx. 0.7 miles away); Hightstown (approx. 3.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Cranbury.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.
 
Monument to the Second Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Stephen Kokoska, July 15, 2016
4. Monument to the Second Presbyterian Church
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stephen Kokoska of North Brunswick, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 105 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Stephen Kokoska of North Brunswick, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on July 16, 2016.
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