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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Washakie in Fremont County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Sacajawea

Baptiste Charbonneau

 

—Bazil —

 
Sacajawea Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 30, 2016
1. Sacajawea Grave Marker
Inscription. (Three monuments are treated here as one marker:)

Sacajawea
Died April 9, 1894
A guide with the Lewis and Clark Expedition
1805-1806
Identified, 1907 by Rev. J. Roberts who officiated at her burial

Dedicated in the memory of
Baptiste Charbonneau
Papoose of the
Lewis and Clark
Expedition - 1805-1806
Son of
Sacajawea
Born Feb. 11, 1805
Died on this reservation 1885
Buried West in the Wind River Mountains
A.D. 1933


Bazil
Son of Sacajawea
Aged 86 years
Died 1886
He was reburied here Jan. 12, 1925
1932

 
Erected 1963 by Wyoming State Organization of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Location. 42° 59.56′ N, 108° 54.866′ W. Marker is near Fort Washakie, Wyoming, in Fremont County. Marker is on Cemetery Lane near Trout Creek Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Washakie WY 82514, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mrs. Maggie Richards and Mrs. Hall (a few steps from this marker);
Baptiste Charbonneau Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 30, 2016
2. Baptiste Charbonneau Grave Marker
The Right Rev. George Maxwell Randall, D.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); Sacajawea Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Sacajawea (about 300 feet away); The Shoshone-Episcopal Mission Boarding School (approx. half a mile away); Block House (approx. 1.4 miles away); Washakie (approx. 1.5 miles away); Fort Washakie World War II Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Washakie.
 
More about this marker. The Sacajawea Cemetery is located on the left about 1/2 mile north of the Trout Creek intersection.
 
Regarding Sacajawea. Bazil was the adopted son of Sacajawea.
 
Also see . . .
1. Sacajawea -- Ancestry.com. Shoshone oral tradition says that Sacajawea did not die in 1813, but instead, wandered the west for a few years and eventually returned to her tribe on the Wind River Reservation. Tradition says she died there on April
Bazil Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 30, 2016
3. Bazil Grave Marker
9, 1884, a venerated and influential member of the tribe, and is buried between her son, Jean Baptiste, and her sister's son, Bazil, whom she adopted. There is a monument over the grave on the Wind River Reservation, of the woman called Sacajawea. Many people who were living at the time wrote and told that it was she who traveled with Lewis and Clark to the great water and that the woman who died at Fort Manuel was another wife of Toussaint Charbonneau.
(Submitted on July 26, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Jean Baptiste Charbonneau. Jean Baptiste was the son of Sacagawea, a Shoshone, and her Métis French Canadian husband Toussaint Charbonneau, who worked as a trapper and interpreter for the Lewis and Clark Expedition; he was born at Fort Mandan in North Dakota. He was taken by his parents as an infant across the country. The Expedition co-leader William Clark nicknamed the boy Pomp. He lived with Clark in St. Louis, Missouri as a boy, where he attended St. Louis Academy. Clark paid for his education. (Submitted on July 26, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

3. The Imagery of Sacagawea by Brian W. Dippie -- Jackson Hole Historical Society. It is astonishing how much has been written about Sacagawea given the paucity of hard information on her. There are few documentary
Sacajawea, Baptiste Charbonneau, and Bazil Grave Markers image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 30, 2016
4. Sacajawea, Baptiste Charbonneau, and Bazil Grave Markers
sources apart from the Lewis and Clark journals, and even the derivation and spelling of her name is at issue. Should it be Sacajawea, supposedly a Shoshone word meaning “Boat -Launcher.” or should it be Sacagawea, a Hidatsa word for “Bird Woman”–the commonly accepted version today- Since attempts at spelling her name in the journals indicate that the third consonant was hard, it has also been rendered Sakakawea, the preferred spelling in North Dakota, just as Sacajawea has been favored in Wyoming, where the legend persists that she lived to a ripe old age, dying on the Wind River Shoshone Reservation in 1884 a few years short of a hundred.
(Submitted on July 26, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Additional keywords. Lewis and Clark Expedition
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative Americans
 
Sacajawea and Pomp (Jean Baptiste Charbonneau) image. Click for full size.
By N/a
5. Sacajawea and Pomp (Jean Baptiste Charbonneau)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 217 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on July 26, 2016.
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